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Full text of "Minutes of the New Hampshire Baptist Convention"

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ALLEN COUNTY Pi 



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3 1833 03010 2336 



Gc 974,2 N41255m 1878 
N ew Ha m p s h i r e Bap t i s t 

Convent i on « 
Minutes of the New Hampshire 

Baptist Convention 



I 



HVLIlvrTTTES 



OF THE 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



^^s§^^ 



W 



FOR THE YEAR 



1878 



NASHUA, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY H. R. WHEELER, STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRINTER. 

1878. 



OO^TTEHsTTS. 



PAGE. 

Officers of Convention, 2 

Constitution and Rules of Order, 3, 4 

Proceedings of Convention, 5-10 

Report of the Board, 11-23 

Reports from Associations, 24-28 

Circular Letter, 29-34 

List of Ordained Baptist Ministers of the State, 34 

Constitution of the Associations, 35 

Rules of Order of the Associations, 35 

Minutes of Meredith Association, 36-40 

" " Dublin " 40-43 

" " Salisbury " 43-46 

" " Milford « 46-50 

" " Portsmouth " 50-53 

" " Newport " 53-58 

" " White Mt. « 58-60 

" " N. II. Baptist Sunday School Convention,. .. 60-61 

" K N. H. Baptist Pastoral Association 62-65 

" " Conference of Baptist Ministers in N. H.,. . . 66-68 

General Tabular View — Meredith Association 69 

Dublin " 70 

" " " Salisbury " 71 

'• " " Milford « 72 

• c . " " Portsmouth " 73 

" " " Newport " 74 

" " " White Mt. " 75 

" u " Summary 75 

Disposition of moneys — tabular statement,. 76 

Statistical Report 76 

Compendium, with arrangements lor next year, 77 

Treasurer's Report, 78 

Compendium of Pastoral Association, 79-80 




*/t1 



MnnTTES 



OF THE 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



X4^ . 






FOR THE YEAR 



1878 



NASHUA, N. H.: 

PRINTED BY H. R. WHEELER, STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRINTER. 

1878. 



OFFICERS OF THE CONVENTION. 



PRESIDENT, 

G. W. NICHOLSON. 



W. V. GARNER, 

SECRETARY, 
W. HURLIN. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS , 

J. N. CHASE. 

TREASURER, 

A. J. PRESCOTT. 



TRUSTEES, 



W. H. EATON, 
E. E. CUMMINGS, 
J. D. TILTON, 
N. HOOPER, 
A. SHERWIN, 
S. C. FLETCHER, 
D. H. STODDARD, 
W. H. ALDEN, 
R. B. MOODY, 
W. H. LEAVELL, 
W. B. SMITH, 



S. HUMPHREY, 



J. S. SWAIM, 

F. MERRIAM, 
S. A. READ, 
E. PEPPER, 
C. WILDER, 
J. S. BROWN, 

N. T. GREENWOOD, 
E. A. BALDWIN, 

G. W. FLETCHER, 
J. M. TEBBETS, 
L. W. CLARK. 



AUDITORS, 



F. S. CRAWFORD. 



PRUDENTIAL COMMITTEE. 



G. W. NICHOLSON, 
J. D. TILTON, 



W. V. GARNER, 
A. SHERWIN, 



A. J. PRESCOTT. 



Letters of business should be directed to Rev. Wm. Hurlin, Secre- 
tary, Antrim. 

Applications for aid, together with the last quarterly reports from 
churches aided, should be forwarded to the Secretary, by the twentieth of 
September. 

Clerks of Associations are requested to send to the Secretary* a manu- 
script copy of their Minutes on or before the first of October. 

All moneys contributed for the Convention should be forwarded to the 
Treasurer, A. J. Prescott, Esq., Concord, on or before the second Wednes- 
day in October, which is the date for closing the accounts for the year. 



ffi n w I"?* Pub,lc Llbraf y 

900 Webster Street 

P0 Box 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-**., t 



CONSTITUTION 



I. This body shall be known by the name of the New Hampshire 
Baptist Convention. 

OBJECT. 

II. The grand object of this Convention shall be to promote the 
preaching of the gospel in this State. 

MEMBERSHIP. 

in. This Convention shall be composed of ordained ministers who 
are members of Baptist churches in the State, of messengers from 
churches which contribute to its funds, and of life members. 

IV. Members of Baptist churches, in good standing, may become life 
members by the payment of twenty dollars, with the understanding 
that they forfeit their life membership if they lose their standing in the 
church. 

V. This Convention will receive no more than two messengers from 
any one church, and it will require of them a certificate of their appoint- 
ment from the church to which they belong. 

OFFICERS. 

VI. The officers of this Convention shall be a President, two Vice 
Presidents, Secretary, and Treasurer. 

BOARD. 

VII. This Convention shall annually elect twenty- two trustees, seven 
of whom shall be laymen from each Association; and these, with the 
officers of the Convention, shall constitute the Board of the Convention. 
The President and Secretary of the Convention shall also act as Presi- 
dent and Secretary of the Board. At all meetings of the Board, five 
shall constitute a quorum. 

VIII. The Board shall annually appoint a Prudential Committee of 
five, with whom the Secretary and Agent may confer whenever desira- 
ble, and at whose request the Secretary shall, at any time, call a special 
meeting of the Board. 

IX. It shall be the duty of the Board to provide measures for raising 
funds for the Convention ; also, to dispose of said funds agreeably to 
the provisions of the Charter and this Constitution, and to transact any 
other business connected therewith. They shall report their doings an- 
nually to the Convention. 

X. All money, specifically designated for any religious object, shall be 
faithfully applied according to such specification, or returned to the donor. 

XL If any vacancy shall occur in the Board during the recess of the 
Convention, they shall have the power to elect, by ballot, some one to 
fill the same. 

SECRETARY. 

XII. The Secretary shall keep a fair record of all the doings of the 
Convention and of the Board; sball conduct all correspondence; shall 
give notice of the meetings of the Convention; and shall take charge of 
all the papers committed to his care, all of which shall be open to the 
inspection of any member of the Convention. 

TREASURER. 

XIII. The Treasurer shall take charge of all money and other prop- 
erty committed to his care; shall keep a fair record of the same; shali 



take special care to enter the names of donors and contributors to the 
funds of this body, together with the objects for which they were con- 
tributed, and shall pay them out pursuant to an order of the Board, 
signed by the Secretary. He shall give bonds for the faithful discharge 
of the duties of his office. He shall annually report to the Convention 
the state of the funds, and at any other time when called upon by the 
Board. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

XIV. The Annual Meeting of the Convention shall be held on the 
third Wednesday of October, at 10 o'clock a. m., in such place as may 
be agreed upon; and a sermon shall be preached by some person previ- 
ously appointed. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

XV. It shall be the privilege of the Clerk of each Association to 
present to the Convention a full and correct account of the condition of 
the churches belonging to the Association which he represents, the 
number of destitute churches, together with such other information 
as the Convention may from time to time require. 

XVI. At every annual meeting there shall be a free public conference, 
in which individuals from each Association shall be invited to give an 
account of the state of religion within their respective limits. 

XVII. No resolution or motion implicating, or in any way interfer- 
ing with the independence of the churches, shall be entertained by this 
Convention. 

XVIII. This Constitution may be altered or amended by a vote of two 
thirds of the members present at any annual meeting of the Convention. 



RULES OF ORDER. 

1. Every sitting of the Convention shall be opened and closed with 
prayer. 

2. Soon after the opening of the Annual Meeting, the Committee of 
Arrangements shall make a report respecting the order and business of 
the meetings of the session. 

3. Every person who speaks shall rise and address the President; and 
no person shall speak more than twice on the same subject without 
leave of the presiding officer. 

4. If, when a motion has been made, or during the discussion, a mem- 
ber opposes its being discussed, the President shall immediately put the 
question, " Shall the question be discussed'? 7 ' If decided in the nega- 
tive, the subject shall be considered as not debatable, and the vote shall 
be taken on the main question. 

"). Those subjects shall be considered as constituting the business first 
in order, which relate to the interests of the denomination in our State; 
and all other topics shall be introduced through the Committee of Ar- 
rangements. 

0. All committees shall be nominated by the President, unless other- 
wise ordered by the Convention. 

7. The Committee of Arrangements for the next Anniversary shall 
be Committee on the Order of Business for the same; and the pastor 
of the church, with which the Anniversary is held, shall be a member 
of the Committee. 

8. These rules shall be read by the President at the opening of the 
session. 



FIFTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING 



OF THE 



NEW HAMPSHIRE BAPTIST CONVENTION. 



Exeter, Oct. 16, 1878. 

The Convention met in the Baptist Meeting House, at 10 
o'clock a. m., and was called to order by Rev. A. Sherwin, Pres- 
ident. Hymn 258 in the Service of Song, was sung, and pray- 
er was offered by Rev. E. E. Cummings, d. d. 

1. The President read the Rules of Order. 

2. Voted, That visiting brethren be invited to enroll their 
names, and participate in the deliberations of the meeting. 

3. The President nominated the following Committees : 

On the order of Business — Revs. J. N. Chase, J. D. Tilton, 
S. C. Fletcher, W". B. Smith, E. J. Emery, H. C. Leavitt, N. 
Hooper, W. H. Alden. 

On Enrollment — Revs. J. F. Fielden, J. S. Swaim, T. C. Glea- 
son, A. S. Stowell. 

On Arrangements for next Year — Revs. E. C. Spinney, W. 
H. Eaton, C. A. Towne, W. H. Leavell, R. B. Moody, G. A. 
Glines. 

On Nominations — Revs. W. V. Garner, D. H. Stoddard, G. 
W. Kinney, E. Pepper, W. Hurlin, F. Merriam, and Bro. N. T. 
Greenwood. 

On Circular Letter — Revs. G. W. Nicholson, O. P. Fuller, 
C. Newhall, D. Gage. 

4. Heard the report of the Committee on the order of busi- 
ness, in part, through Rev. J. N. Chase. Adopted. 

5. The Committee on Enrollment subsequently reported the 
following list. 



PASTORS. 



W. H. Alden, Portsmouth, 

I. J. Burgess, Hampton Falls, 

J. N. Chase, Exeter. 

W. H. Eaton, Keene, 

S. C. Fletcher, New London, 

O. P. Fuller, Plaistow, 

J. F. Fielden, Franklin Falls, 

W. V. Garner, Concord, 

T. C. Gleason, No. Conway, 

G. A. Glines, Cornish, 

K. S. Hall, Lake Village, 

G. W. Kinney, Hudson, 

W. H. Leavell, Manchester, 

W. Libby, Wilton, 

F. Merriam, Danbury. 



R. B. Moody, Milford, 

C. Newhall, Brentwood, 
G. W. Nicholson, Nashua, 
E. Pepper, Bradford, 

E. L. Scott, So. Hampton, 
A. Sherwin, Manchester, 
W. B. Smith, Fisherville, 
E. C. Spinney, Concord, 

D. H. Stoddard, Great Falls, 
A. S. Stowell, Salem, 

J. S. SWAIM, Claremont, 

J. D. Tilton, Rumney, 

C. A. Towne, Dover, 

J. H. Wells, Newton, 

J. L. Whittemore, Richmond. 



DELEGATES. 



J. G. Abbott, Antrim, 

J. D. Akerman, Portsmouth, 

C. E. Albee, Claremont, 
F. C. Bbown, Chester, 
T. Butters, Concord, 

F. S. Crawford, Concord, 

D. Flanders, Plaistow, 
W. H. Foye, Dover, 

J. French, Portsmouth, 

T. B. Garland, Dover, 

S. M. Greene, Cornish, 

N. T. Greenwood, New London, 

J. G. Hutchinson, Goffstown, 

D. Jewell, Brentwood, 

A. J. Kidder, New London, 

R. T. King, Nashua, 

S. F. Learned, Chester, 



Mrs. L. Merrill, Rumney, 

H. C. Moses, Exeter, 

J. Paige, E. Weare, 

D. P. Perkins, Manchester, 

A. J, Prescott, Concord, 

I. F. Purinton, So. Hampton, 

D. Smith, Exeter, 

J. Spear, Manchester, 

D. Stevens, Deerfield, 

J. M. Tebbets, Great Falls, 
Mrs. J. D. Tilton, Rumney, 

E. B. Towle, Hampton Falls, 

P. P. Whitehouse, So. Hampton r 
C. Wilder, Peterborough, 
J. Williams, Plaistow, 

B. G. Young, Franklin Falls. 



MINISTERS NOT PASTORS. 



A. Brown, Newton, 

J. Clement, Chester, 

E. E. Cummings, Concord, 

J. E. Dame, Farmington, 

T. B. Eastman, No. Sutton, 



D. Gage, Manchester, 
N. Hooper, Exeter, 
W. Hurlin, Antrim, 
J. Upton, Brentwood, 
S. S. White, So. Hampton. 



VISITING BRETHREN. 



W. C. Barrows, Biddeford, Me., 
H. II. Beam an, W. Bridge water, 

Mass. , 
N. J. Clark, Philadelphia, Penn., 
(i. W. Gardner, Boston, Mass., 
G. W. Gilk, Lawrence, Mass., 
L. HAYDEN, Washington, D. C., 
C. F. Holbrook, Saco, Me., 



B. Knight, Salem, Mass., 
J. L. Sanborn, Waterboro, Me.. 
G. S. Smith, Shapleigh, Me., 
J. Storer, E. Haverhill, Mass., 
A. Webster, Hyde Park, Mass., 
E. Worth, Kennebunk, Me., 
T. E. Balch, Wakefield, Mass. r 
E. J. MacEwan, New London. 



6. The Secretary, Rev. K. S. Hall, read the report of the 
Board. 

Hymn 747 was sung. 

7. Voted, That the report of the Board be laid on the table. 

8. The Committee on the Circular Letter reported, recom- 
mending that it be read before the Convention. Adopted. 

9. The Treasurer read his report. 

10. The Circular Letter was read by its author, Rev. G. W. 
Kinney, and it was adopted, and ordered to be printed in the 
Minutes. 

Adjourned. Prayer by Rev. D. Gage. 

Afteenoon Session. 

Met pursuant to adjournment. Hymn 757 was sung and 
prayer was offered by Rev. L. Hayden, d. d. 

11. Rev. W. V. Garner, for the Committee on Nominations, 
reported a list of officers, omitting the Secretary, on account of 
a recommendation in the Reports of the Board, which had not 
been considered by the Convention. Report adopted. (See 
page 2.) 

12. Heard the Reports from the several Associations. 

13. Rev. G. E. Street, of Exeter, Delegate from the Gener- 
al Association of New Hampshire, (Congregational,) presented 
the christian salutations of that body. 

14. Rev. W. V. Garner, reported his visit to the last meet- 
ing of the General Association, which was held in Concord. 

15. Dea. Brown spoke in behalf of the N. H. Bible Society. 

16. Voted, That the Reports from the Associations be print- 
ed with the Minutes. (See page 24,) 

17. Voted, That the Report of the Board be taken from the 
table. The suggestions of the Prudential Committee, present- 
ed in that report, with reference to new plans of work, were 
then considered, and after a somewhat animated discussion, in 
which Brethren Cummings, Stoddard, Webster, Eaton, J. D. 
Tilton, Fielden, Sherwin, Libby and Gage, participated, the 
first, second and third suggestions, were adopted. (See page , 13.) 

Pending a motion to adopt the fourth suggestion, the follow- 
ing Brethren spoke, viz: Hurlin, Wilder, Merriam, Fielden, 



8 

Garner, Kinney, Eaton, Sherwin, J. D. Tilton, and Cumraings. 

The hour of adjournment having arrived, it was 

Voted, That fifteen minutes be added to the time. The dis- 
cussion of the subject was then continued by Brethren Stod- 
dard, Prescott and Garner. It was then 

Voted, That this suggestion be referred to the Prudential 
Committee for re-consideration, and that they report to-morrow. 

Adjourned. Prayer by Rev. E. Worth. 

Evening Session. 

The Convention met at half past 7 o'clock. 

18. After prayer, Rev. G. W. Gardner, d. d., spoke on be- 
half of the Baptist Missionary Union, and made special refer- 
ence to the wonderful work among the Teloogoos. 

19. Professor MacEwan, Principal of Colby Academy, spoke 
on behalf of that Institution. 

20. The Annual Sermon was preached by Rev. J. F. Field- 
en. Text, John 1, 23. 

21. Rev. J. N. Chase presented a further report, from the 
Committee on the Order of Business, which was adopted. 

Adjourned. Prayer by Rev. E. Pepper. 

Thursday Moening. 

The Convention met at 9 o'clock. After singing, "I Need 
Thee Every Hour," prayer was offered by Rev. S. C. Fletcher. 

22. Heard a report from the Prudential Committee, through 
Rev. W. V. Garner, with reference to their fourth suggestion, 
as follows : 

Your Committee recommend that the Convention devise 
means and plans for the speedy creation of a permanent fund for 
the purpose of erecting houses of worship in new localities 
which give promise of growth. 

Voted, That this report be referred to the Board. 

23. Voted, That Rev. N. F. Tilden be a delegate to the 
Congregational General Association, and that Rev. E. E. Cum- 
mings, d. d., be a delegate to the Methodist Conference. 

24. The Committee on Nominations reported the name of 
Rev. A. Sherwin for Secretary. Adopted. 



25. Rev. W. V. Garner offered the following resolution, 
which was adopted by the members of the Convention rising : 

"That the thanks of this Convention are due, and are hereby 
tendered to Rev. K. S. Hall, on his retirement from the office 
of Secretary, for the able and faithful manner in which he has 
performed the duties of the position for the long term of eighteen 

years." 

26. Rev. J. D. Tilton, on behalf of a Committee appointed 
by the Board, presented the following resolution, which was 
also adopted by the members of the Convention rising : 

" Whereas, Rev. D. Gage has closed his labors as our Mission- 
ary and Agent, in which capacities he has served for twenty- 
three years with great fidelity, perseverance and efficiency, we 
would, in closing these special relations, which have been so 
long sustained with a great degree of satisfaction to our denom- 
ination throughout the State, express our high appreciation of 
his arduous work in which he has become worn, and has attain- 
ed to a good old age, and a good degree ; we extend our warm 
sympathy and cordial christian regard for him as a dear brother 
in Christ and fellow worker in the ministry, and assure him 
that our prayers shall still be offered for him, that the blessing 
of God may be with him, rendering his future as genial, joyful 
and spiritual as the past of his experience, and abundantly more 
so to the glory of God, and his usefulness in whatever depart- 
ments of labor he may be employed, and we would commend 
him to our churches who may need pastoral work." 

27. Rev. A. Sherwin declined serving as Secretary, and his 
resignation was accepted, and the Committee on Nominations 
were requested to present another name. 

28. The Committee on Arrangements for next year, report- 
ed through Rev. E. C. Spinney, as follows : Place of Meeting, 
New London ; Preacher, Rev. W. H. Leavell ; Alternate, Rev. 
J. S. Swaim ; Circular Letter, Rev. A. V. Tilton ; Alternate, 
Rev. A. J. Hopkins 

29. The Committee on Enrollment reported. (See page 6.) 

30. Voted, That the Report of the Board be printed with 
the Minutes. 

31. Voted, That the Treasurer's Report be adopted and 
printed. 

32. The Committee on Nominations reported the name of 
Rev. Wm. Hurlin, for Secretary, and the report was adopted. 



10 



33. Rev. W. Libby presented the following resolution which 
was referred to the Board : 

"That the Secretary shall keep himself in communication 
with the several churches of the Convention, in order to secure 
collections and legacies for the benefit of the Convention, and 
shall also advise and consult with the feeble churches, to the 
end that all may have and sustain settled pastors." 

34. Voted, That the thanks of this Convention be tendered 
to the Baptist church with which we are assembled, and also to 
to its friends for their generous hospitalities ; to the choir for 
their acceptable services, and to the several railroad companies 
which have reduced their fares. 

35. Voted, That Rev. E. Pepper be a member of the Board 
of Trustees. 

36. Voted, That we recommend the observance of the week 
of prayer, in January, by the Baptist churches of this State, in 
common with other evangelical churches throughout the world, 
with the request that Thursday of that week be observed as a 
day of special prayer for Colby Academy at New London, and 
all other institutions of learning. 

After prayer by Rev. W. H. Eaton, d. d., the Convention ad- 
journed to meet in New London on the third Wednesday in 
October, 1879. 

G. W. NICHOLSON, President, 

WM. HURLIN, Secretary. 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



With grateful acknowledgement of the mercy that has spared 
us thu£ far, we commence this report of another period of ser- 
vice in behalf of the Baptist churches of New Hampshire. 

But while we are -continued for a longer term of labor, the 
past year has witnessed the departure of some who were for- 
merly associated with us. After the lapse of more than fifty 
years from its formation, the last of the corporate members and 
first Secretary of the Convention, Rev. James Barnaby, died at 
West Harwich, Mass., Dec. 10, at the advanced age of 90. 

Rev. Philip Chamberlain died at Milford, Feb. 19, aged 82. 
Rev. Horace Eaton, who was supplying the church at Chester, 
was smitten with disease and passed away from his^ home in 
Wakefield, Mass., in June, and Rev. Phineas Bond died in 
Maine a lew weeks since. All of these brethren had held sev- 
eral pastorates each in the State, and only laid off the harness 
after years of toil. 

We are painfully conscious in rendering up our account, of 
our failure to accomplish all that might have been exbected of 
us, as almoners of the bounty of the churches. We can but 
wish it had fallen to the lot of wiser heads and warmer hearts 
to plan more aggressive movements upon the kingdom of dark- 
ness and more successful methods for the advancement of the 
cause of truth and righteousness. The year just passed has 
been one of depression and trial for many of us, and various ob- 
stacles have beset our paths, which leads us to enquire whether 
the former days were better than these ? 

In olden times, the promulgation of our principles awakened 
much opposition, and sometimes was followed by fines and im- 
prisonment ; but no such opposition or injustice raise a barrier 
to our progress at the present day. Instead, we encounter an 
apathy that is hard to arouse, or a grovelling, discontented mur- 
muring about the scarcity of, financial resources, which makes 



12 

the eDJoyment of religious privileges, or the response ^o the 
calls of benevolence a grievous hardship. Was there no such 
trouble in the days of our fathers ? Was there generally a read- 
ier response to the appeals of the gospel than now ? Did the 
majority of church members in their days esteem it a luxury to 
contribute of their substance for the expenses of religious wor- 
ship ? Or have we fallen upon peculiarly evil times, which 
would put to the test a stronger faith and zeal than were pos- 
sessed by the fathers ? 

It is with sadness that we sum up the meagre results of the 
past season. At the last annual meeting of the Convention it 
was strongly urged that w r e should put forth more vigorous and 
aggressive movements in behalf of our home work, and we had 
fondly hoped to realize this result. But we have struck out no 
new paths, entered no new fields, organized no new r methods, and 
employed no new agencies for the prosecution of new enterpri- 
ses. We have been fettered by untoward circumstances. But it 
ma y well be a question how much of this bondage has been real 
and how much fancied ; how much placidly acquiesced in, and 
how much necessarily, but unwillingly endured .It is a matter 
for grave enquiry whether the straitness of the times has not 
been made a charitable mantle to cover a multitude of sins of 
needless omission. We are only required to bring in the tithes 
into God's store-house ; but have we brought in the tithes ? Has 
the Lord of the harvest received all that he claims for his own? 

At the last annual meeting of the Board, the Prudential Com- 
mittee were authorized to appoint an exploring agent and mis- 
sionary in the State, for the term of three months or more, as 
soon as in their judgment a suitable man could be found to enter 
the field. The Committee have not been able to carry out this 
arrangement, so much needed, in the judgment of the Board, 
for the more vigorous prosecution and greater success of our 
domestic work. They have found neither the man nor the 
means requisite to this result. 

The report of the Committee to the Board, an extract of 
which is here given, shows that they have labored with zeal for 
the enlargement anYl suceess of the cause held in trust. 

After referring to the matter of devising and adopting new 



13 



plans and measures for the more successful prosecution of our 
State work as suggested by the Board, the Committee report 
that— 

"This duty has not been ignored, though but little in the line of practi- 
cal changes has been accomplished. Your Committee have felt that in 
some directions at least, there should be radical changes and a complete 
overturning in our methods of work, if we would secure the best denom- 
inational results. But the changes which they deem not only desirable 
but necessary to the growth and enlargement of our denomination in the 
State, are so radical in their character that they have no place within their 
limited province, but properly belong to the larger and more authoritative 
bodies which they represent; to wit, the Board and the churches associa- 
ted in Convention. 

Your Committee have been unanimous in the opinion that there are 
new fields rich in promise which might be entered and secured with a 
comparatively small outlay, and that some of our feeble interests might be 
developed into stronger churches, if the right men could be put in charge. 
But in the matter of establishing new interests, the Committee could do 
nothing, inasmuch as no provision had been made by the Board for defray- 
ing the expenses which would necessarily be incurred in such an enter- 
prise. 

In the matter of ministering to the wants of some of our most destitute 
churches, something has been done. Early in the year, your agent was 
directed to proceed at once to Coos County where there was not a single 
Baptist pastor, and labor with the churches in that region until the meet- 
ing of the White Mountain Association. When that Association met in 
the month of June with the church in North Stratford, every member of 
your Committee was on the ground and carefully canvassed the field. The 
church at North Stratford was regarded as the key to the position and it 
was deemed of great importance that a good and true man should be placed 
in charge at once. * * * * Brother Samuel A. Reed/a recent gradu- 
ate of the Newton Institution was sought out and finally engaged to go to 
Coos County, survey the field, and ascertain what, if anything could be 
done. The result of his visit Uas been his settlement as pastor over the 
church at Stratford. 

During the year the Secretary of the Committee has corresponded with 
nearly all the churches in the State in regard to the raising funds for Con- 
vention work and has received responses very generally — indeed only one 
or two failing to reply. 

In connection with this brief summary of the doings of your Commit- 
tee, we would suggest for your consideration some of those changes in our 
plans and methods which are deemed necessary to the successful prosecu- 
tion of our work. 

First, We would suggest that the State Agency and the Secretaryship 
of the Board be combined and both offices vested in one person. 

Second, That the agent be relieved from the work of collecting funds. 

Third, That a responsible Committee be appointed in each Association 
whose business it shall be to see that the churches do their full duty in 
the matter of raising money for Convention work. 

Finally, We would suggest that a portion of the invested funds belong- 
ing to the Convention be used for the purpose of erecting houses of wor- 
ship in localities which give promise of success and that such investments 
be governed by such regulations as those adopted by the Baptist Home 
Mission Society in the same line of work." * 



14 



At the meeting of the Board at Concord, in October last, 
appropriations were granted to twenty-six churches to the 
amount of $2,475. The Prudential Committee subsequently 
added a further appropriation of $75.00 to the church in Sun- 
cook, making a total of $2,550. 

From the reports of the several churches, we gather the fol- 
lowing facts for your consideration. 

Acworth. Rev. William J. Smith commenced his pastoral labors with 
this church Nov. 25, and closed the same March 25, on account of ill 
health. The sabbath following Bro. J. D. Graham entered upon his la- 
bors, having held a series of meetings in the place in the preceding au- 
tumn. Early in the year the Sabbath School was re-organized, after a 
long vacation, and has gradually increased in numbers and interest. There 
has-been a similar increase in the attendance upon public worship. Total 
56 ; loss 6 ; appropriation $75. 

Amherst. This church reports a good degree of harmony and interest 
with a steady gain of numbers in the congregation. Total 77; loss 5 ; ap- 
propriation $50. 

Canaan. Rev. Joshua Currier closed a six months' pastorate with 
this people April 21 ; thus they are again left as sheep without a shepherd. 
With a resident membership of but twenty, they find it difficult to sustain 
the means of grace. Total 43 ; loss 2; appropriation $125. 

Chester. This church was supplied by Rev. Horace Eaton for about 
four months, at the beginning of the Conventional year, at the expiration 
of which time, he was laid aside from farther ministerial labor by reason 
of sickness. Since then, it has been regularly ministered to by Rev. Josh- 
ua Clement. They rejoice over the completion of their new church edi- 
fice after so many delays. It was dedicated Aug. 29. While grateful for 
their outward prosperity, they are laboring in hope of a rich harvest of 
spiritual blessings. Baptisms 1 ; total 58 ; gain 1 ; appropriation $100. 

Conway. From Oct. 25 to Nov. 25 meetings were held every evening 
and also in the afternoons of the first week. They were aided in the 
meetings by Revs. J D. Tilton and T. M. Merriman of the Meredith Asso- 
ciation, D. IT. Stoddard of the Portsmouth, and J. F. Fielden of the Sal- 
isbury, and by Dea. S. K. Mitchell of Haverhill, Mass. As the result, an 
interest in the subject of religion was awakened in the community, the 
church was quickened and sinners converted. Baptisms 7 ; total 41 ; gain 
8; appropriation $150. 

D anbury, Has had a few valuable accessions, and enjoyed a good de- 
gree of, prosperity. One brother is preparing for the ministry at Newton, 
and two others are pursuing tbeir studies at~Colby University. They re- 
quest no further aid for the present, hoping after so long a time of depen- 
dence, to become self sustaining. Baptisms 2; total 42; gain 5; appro- 
priation $50. 

East We are. A good degree of interest is reported the first quarter. 
Their pastor left the first of June for a visit to his home in England. 
While without preaching, they maintained sabbath and week day prayer 
meetings and the Sabbath School. Total 4(5; loss 1; appropriation $100. 

F tzwilltam. Rev. Sumner Latham closed his labors on the last sab- 
bath in March. They have had preaching everv sabbath but two during 

1 



15 

the year. Kev. William Reed entered upon his pastoral duties July 7. 
Prayer meetings have been well attended. They express themselves will- 
ing to contribnte according to their ability for the support of the gospel 
among themselves, but find it hard to raise the requisite amount. Total 
72; loss 2; appropriation $125. 

Goshen. In their last quarterly report they express regret at the pros- 
pective loss of their pastor, who has served them faithfully for a little more 
than a year. They request aid in the support of preaching for the year to 
come. Total 69 ; loss 1 ; appropriation $100. 

Hampton Falls. They were encouraged by the aid granted them, and 
express gratitude for spiritual and temporal mercies. Total 67 ; loss 1 ; 
appropriation $75. 

Hinsdale. Under the labors of Rev. C. A. Piddock they have been 
greatly cheered and strengthened. A better state of feeling and greater 
harmony prevail in the church, and sinners have been converted to Christ 
and added to their membership. Baptisms 14; total 85; gain 9; appro- 
priation $125. 

Lyme. This church has made a change of pastors. Rev. S. S. White 
being succeeded by Rev. E. P. Merrifield, May 12. They have been favor- 
ed with some religious awakening and a few additions within the year. 
Baptisms 4; total 76; gain 3; appropriation $50. 

Lyndeborough. Like the church just named, this one has also 
changed pastors during the year, Rev. William R. Warner closed his la- 
bor March 3, and May 5, Rev. H. G. Hubbard assumed the -oversight of 
this flock. Very little change is reported in their spiritual condition. To- 
tals; loss 5; appropriation $100. 

Meredith. They report very few changes within the year. Their 
pastor closed his labors Oct. 6. Total 73; gain 2: appropriation $50. 

New Ipswich. Through the goodness of God, they have enjoyed the 
labors ef a self-denying pastor during the entire year; it is feared his la- 
bors must soon close for want of adequate pecuniary support. They re- 
port themselves as never so poor financially as now, but stronger spiritu- 
ally, through lopping off some dead branches. Baptisms 2; total 29; loss 
20; appropriation $125. 

North Sanbornton. The past has been a season of mingled blessings 
and trials. Some have been added to their number of those hopefully 
converted, while it has been found necessary to withdraw the hand of fel- 
lowship from others who were walking disorderly. Baptisms 3; total 82; 
gain 1 ; appropriation $75. 

Peterborough. This church has been numerically reduced by the 
dismission of several non-resident members and the exclusion of delin- 
quent ones; a process which is thought to have materially strengthened 
the remaining working force. There have also been some additions. — 
Baptisms 12 ; total 94 ; appropriation $125. 

Pittsfield. Rev. J. M. Coburn resigned the pastoral office early in 
the year, and has been succeeded by Rev. Edwin Bromley, late of Nor- 
wood, Mass. They report themselves as in a good condition to labor for 
the Master. Have chosen two new deacons and various committees for 
different portions of church work. Baptisms 4 ; total 125 ; gain 6 ; appro- 
priation $100. 

Richmond. After a lapse of eight or ten years of inaction, they have 
been aided in their efforts to sustain preaching for the last three years by 



16 



the Convention. In all their period of despondency, there was no depart- 
ure from the distinctive principles of the denomination. They are en- 
couraged by the few accessions from time to time of those seeking a home 
with them. They are very few in numbers, and therefore seek assistance 
from abroad, hoping for a ha rvest in due time. Baptisms 2 ; total 21 ; gain 
3; appropriation .$100. 

Salem. The past year has not been one of spiritual ingathering, but 
a good degree of material prosperity has been enjoyed. The ladies have 
purchased a new organ for the church and removed the old one to the 
vestry, which they have also furnished with blinds. In closing their last 
report they write: "This quarter closes the twelfth year in which we have 
received aid from the Convention. Without that aid we could not have 
maintained our existence as a church in all human probability. We rec- 
ognize, however, the obligation of self support at as early a date as possi- 
ble, therefore, with the deepest gratitude lor past help, we will make the 
effort, with the help of God, to support ourselves the coming year, and 
will pledge to the Convention our sympathies, and, as soon as circum- 
stances will allow, our contributions. We depend, however, upon the 
full amount of our appropriation this year to enable us to take this step " 
Total 64 ; loss 2 ; appropriation $125. 

South Hampton. The pastoral office has been filled the past year by 
Rev. E. L. Scott. No very marked changes have taken place in their con- 
dition or prospects, save the loss of ability to sustain the preached word 
caused by deaths and removals ; a loss, as they estimate it of twenty-five 
per cent. Baptisms 2; total 34; appropriation $75. 

Stratford. Rev. J. L. Sanborn closed his pastorate with this people 
April 15, having been with them seven years and a half. Since the com- 
mencement of the last quarter, they have been regularly supplied by Bro. 
Samuel A. Reed, a graduate of Newton Theological Institution, who was 
ordained as pastor of the church on the 9th inst. With a resident mem- 
bership of only eighteen, they promise him a salary of $500, desiring the 
Convention to furnish $150 of the amount. Several conversions are re- 
ported as the result of the preaching of Bro. Graham in February and 
March. Total 27 ; loss 4 ; appropriation $100. 

Suncook. They complain of spiritual coldness, the result in part of 
their financial condition, they having become involved in debt something 
less than $300, from which they see no way of relief. Total 68; gain 2; 
appropriation $150. 

Tkoy. They have toiled on through the year amid many discourage- 
ments. At the present time, the pastor is in feeble health, as he has been 
for some time past. During the last quarter, when he has been unable to 
preach, the pulpit has been acceptably supplied by his son, a recent grad- 
uate of Newton. For two weeks past, he has been holding extra meetings 
with manifest good results. Total 81 ; loss 5 ; appropriation $100. 

Wilton. This church has suffered from the disaffection of some of her 
members, caused by a painful case of discipline; but is hoping, laboring 
and praying for the dawning of brighter days. Baptisms 3 ; total 74 ; loss 
5 ; appropriation $100. 

Woodstock. No special changes have marked the history of this church 
during the year. They have been favored with the- regular instructions 
of the word except for a short season, when they were somewhat inter- 
rupted by the illness of the pastor. They feel the importance of main 
taining a church of their own faith in their isolated position; but are 
hoping, that in due time, their material prosperity will be so enhanced, 



17 



that they shall become self-sustaining. They earnestly desire to see the 
cause of God triumph in their midst, in order to which they need to have 
their hearts warmed by Divine grace, so that they may not shrink from 
any duty which that success may require. Total 60 ; loss 3 ; appropria- 
tion $100. 

From the above, it will be readily seen, that twelve of the 
twenty-six churches, report fifty-six baptisms in all, — ten a gain 
of forty members, and twelve a loss of fifty-six, making a net 
loss of sixteen. Had the last quarter's returns been received 
from all the churches, it is hoped these figures would have been 
improved. Most of these bodies, although disappointed in not 
receiving quarterly payments, have regularly forwarded their 
returns, thus enabling those whose duty it was, to sympathize 
with them in their joys and sorrows, and minister more under- 
standing^ to their necessities. 

Rev. David Gage has continued in the service of the Con- 
vention as heretofore. With the exception of two sabbaths, 
one spent at Brentwood, and another at East Weare, he sup- 
plied the church in Londonderry for some four months, preach- 
ing twice every sabbath in the church and in the evening in a 
school house near the depot. At the latter place, the situation 
is far more favorable for gathering a congregation ; and the la- 
bors of the Agent were largely directed towards securing the 
moving of their meeting house, to that location ; but without 
success. The church were offered a gift of land on which to 
place their house, but did not see fit to remove, preferring to 
let their light shine upon the hill for a longer season. 

Five sabbaths in March and April were spent with the church 
at South Lyndeborough, then destitute, which vacancy he as- 
sisted them in supplying. In the mean while, he visited East 
Canaan, where he found the pastor about leaving, on account of 
ill health. This church was afterwards supplied for a time in 
the summer by a student from Newton. 

By direction of the Prudential Committee, he went to the 
north part of the State, remaining from the first of May till past 
the middle of June ; preaching in Carroll, Jefferson, Lancaster, 
and North Stratford, and visiting from house to house. All of 
these towns were at that time without Baptist pastors. The 
last named vacancy having been filled, there is now one pastor 



18 

in Coos County, and another in the Association, over the line 
in Vermont. 

Leaving this portion of the field, he visited Brentwood, War- 
ner, Milford, Greenville, New Ipswich, Salem, Antrim, East Wash- 
ington, Hudson, Bow, Rumney, Keene, Troy, Amherst, North Sut- 
ton and Newport, for the purpose of raising funds. In closing he 
adds: 

"I have also attended and addressed five Associations. During 
the year I have preached ninety-eight times ; attended one hundred 
and four prayer meetings and made one hundred and sixty -four vis- 
its. During my connection with the Convention as Missionary, I 
have gathered two churches, aided in the building of two meeting 
houses ; opened ten houses of worship that had been for a long time 
closed ; baptized one hundred and nine and preached more than fif- 
teen hundred sermons. During the forty-three years of my Chris- 
tian ministry, I think I can honestly say that I have never felt that 
I was more in the way of duty than during the twenty-three years 
of my missionary work for the Convention. I have labored very 
pleasantly with the pastors of the churches. It rejoices my heart 
to see so many young ministers coming into the State, to take the 
places of those who must soon pass into the spirit land. It is my 
prayer that they may be blessed of God in the salvation of many 
precious souls." 

We trust we shall be pardoned, if we point out some of tha more 
imperative needs for the successful prosecution of our missionary 
labors, and briefly hint at some of the obstacles which have seem- 
ingly retarded our progress in the past. 

One of the first and most essential requisites, for the prosecution 
of any enterprise in which two or more people are engaged, is har- 
mony in council. Mutual agreement upon some definite plan of 
operations is an indispensable factor in making up the account. It 
was when the disciples lifted up their voice to God with one accord 
that the place of assembly was shaken, and the multitude of believ- 
ers, being of one heart and soul, they were all filled with the Holy 
Ghost, and spake the word of God with boldness, — and great grace 
was upon them all. We need to have well defined ideas of the 
work to be accomplished, and a hearty agreement in the selection 
of the best methods to be employed to secure its accomplishment. 

Having formed our mutual plans, after a patient and prayerful 
exercise of the highest wisdom which God bestows, we need con- 
certed action in carrying out those plans. The most skilfully or- 



19 



ganized campaign, in time of war, may end in a disastrous defeat, 
if each common soldier acts the part of a guerilla, or if each captain 
constitutes himself a general and assumes to direct the tide of bat- 
tle by the whim of the moment. So in spiritual warfare, our well 
drilled soldiers ought to concentrate their efforts in the common aim 
to dislodge the enemy from his strongholds. 

Another need for the prosecution of our work, and which 
presses itself upon our notice with more urgency from year to 
year, is a larger amount of funds. When we count up at the 
close of the year the visible results of our work, we are some- 
times tempted by the lack of sheaves, to enquire whether the 
reapers have been faithful with the sickle. But, before we 
cast censure upon any, we need to enquire how many of them 
have had their hands palsied in the weary struggle for bread. 
The daily questioning of "what shall we eat, and what shall we 
drink, and wherewithal shall we be clothed," tends neither to 
promote mental vigor nor spiritual strength. When Paul 
wrought at his trade of a tent maker, and was chargeable to 
none for his maintenance, he taught that those who preached 
the gospel should live' of the gospel. 

We speak upon this point with reluctance, knowing too well 
how hard it has been for many to obtain money during the past 
year ; but when clergymen are compelled to pay ordinary day 
laborers, for the service they may need, much higher wages than 
they themselves receive, there is little equality or justice. It 
shows the appreciation in which religious offices are held in the 
community. Would we make -our preachers strong mentally 
and spiritually to do the work that is needed at their hands, 
we must provide for them a comfortable maintenance and re- 
lieve them of all undue anxiety for the wants of the morrow. 
Some of them can rub along for a few years on the scanty sums 
they are now receiving, but if obliged to spend all their work- 
ing years in this way, they will purchase for themselves and 
families free tickets to the poor-house in time of sickness or old 
age, unless the Lord providentially interpose for their relief. 

We need more consecrated wealth among our people gener- 
ally. A larger amount is needed in the treasury for .the sup- 
port of preaching in the churches already established, and also 



20 



to plant the standard in new fields, where there may be oppor- 
tunity to build up strong and vigorous interests. 

In times like the present, when the pressure of want is felt in 
many a household, where formerly was abundance, there is a 
loud call for increased self-denial, on the part of pastors and peo- 
ple. To a portion of our pastors, this is not applicable. When 
by the necessities of their limited allowances they are kept con- 
stantly at the point where they know the meaning of pinching 
want, with all its deprivations and mortifications, they have 
reached the limit of of proper self-denial, in the estimation of 
reasonable people. 

But there are occasionally to be met, those who are very im- 
provident in the management of their resources j who are always 
embarrassed with debts which cripple their own energies, and 
are a source of grief and mortification to the churches they serve. 
Upon such as as these we would urge a self-denial which should 
husband their resources, and, if these are limited, a wise economy 
in their use. 

While of the very few, raised above pecuniary pressure by the 
more abundant means or generosity of the flock over whom they 
are placed, we would enquire if they owe nothing in the way of 
Christian charity and kindness, to these less favored brethren 
and less favored churches ? Will not a little self-denial on their 
part, enable them to obey the Scriptural injunction: "Bear ye 
one another's burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ ?" 

But if there is need of self-denial in the pulpit, there is no less 
occasion for it in the pew. We have on our list to-day too 
many churches afflicted with a species of chronic immobility and 
dependence. Y"ear after year they repeat the same story of loss- 
es by deaths and removals, by which their ranks are thinned and 
their tunds diminished. These circumstances are of themselves 
disheartening ; but a still more disheartening view of the-case is 
the small number of additions. At the rate of decrease in some 
localities, the Convention will soon need to do all the work. We 
cannot reasonably look for as large increase among a sparse pop- 
ulation as in large communities ; but while these latter have 
many advantages in their favor, they also have some serious 
drawbacks. People in the country have more leisure for serious 
meditation, and far less temptations to go astray than those in 



21 

more populous communities; and again, if money flows less free- 
ly among them, they have far less calls for its use. We do not 
think it unreasonable for the Convention to expect growth, in- 
stead of decay, among these rural churches, so long pensioners 
upon its bounty. 

In order to this there must be self-denial on the part of the mem- 
bers. That part of the reports, "All our members do not aid in 
the support of preaching;" needs to have the negative truthfully 
omitted. Members of churches who do not contribute for the sup- 
port of the gospel in their own midst in proportion to their ability, 
have too long been carried as a dead weight by our churches. Un- 
less they are speedily removed, they threaten to drag down and 
crush the whole body. Disaffection with the pastor, or some of the 
members, may usually be scented afar off as the cause of this bur- 
den. He who has not grace enough to acquiesce in the will of the 
majority, and co-operate with them in building up the cause of 
Christ, even if it goes against his personal preferences, has not grace 
enough to remain in any church, provided of course, the majority 
continues to keep the faith and ordinances as delivered to them. 

The inborn covetousness of some, called by the apostle, idolatry, is 
another cause of this withholding —all such should be cast out as 
heathen. We have too many members, who would not hesitate, as 
David did about accepting the gift of a piece of land upon which 
to erect an altar for the worship of God ; they would accept not on- 
ly the land, but would still hold out their hands for a contribution 
wherewith to build the altar ; furthermore, it would save them 
trouble if Araunah would also furnish the priest to slay the sacri- 
fice. Then they would lift up their voices, if the effort were not 
too fatiguing, and cheerfully sing the refrain : 

"I'm glad salvation's free" — 
or the other : 

"Nothing either great or small 

Remains for me to do; 
Jesus paid it all." 

The call, — "Honor the Lord with thy substance, and the first 
fruits of thine increase," would not disturb their delicious ecstacy. 

But while there is a necessity laid upon our poorer brethren to 
practice self-denial, the call is not less imperative upon those pos- 
sessing a greater abundance of this world's goods. Many of them 



22 

cheerfully contribute a portion of their substance for religious pur- 
poses, at home «and abroad ; but the liberality needs to become 
more general. There needs to be awakened on the part of our in- 
telligent laymen a deeper and more t wide spread interest in our 
home field. The expenses for the maintenance of public worship 
in their own midst are oftentimes heavy, and their liberal contribu- 
tions are needed for sending the gospel to the heathen, but they are 
surrounded on every hand, throughout the length and breadth of 
the State, by poorer brethren, who have a scriptural claim upon 
their regard and almsgiving. There needs to be a more intelligent 
appreciation of home duties and responsibilities, and a heartier zeal 
in building up the cause in our own allotted field. There is a mul- 
titude of the needy and unsaved at our very doors, who will never 
receive the gospel, unless it is carried to them by friendly hands. 

There are many churches discouraged, because of changed cir- 
cumstances, who need a little material aid and much encouragement 
before they will learn the grace of self-help. These should receive 
the timely assistance of sufficient means for their necessities, and a 
large share of warm hearted sympathy and cheerful counsel. There 
is nothing of novelty in this work ; but it is one of necessity laid 
upon our churches, if they would save some portions of our State 
from moral waste and degradation. 

Another want, most deeply felt, but which we sometimes hardly 
dare lisp for fear of giving unnecessary pain, and wounding where 
we would only heal, is a larger amount of consecrated talent. 
True, talent is a heaven born gift ; but each one is required, ac- 
cording to the word of God, to double the gift. It is to be feared 
that some of our ministers, having only a limited number of these 
gifts bestowed, settle down over small churches, with small salaries, 
and content themselves with small efforts and small results. 

Our churches all desire "smart men" for the pastoral office ; and 
it is manifestly the duty of all who fill that office to be smart in a 
certain sense. Diligent in business and fervent in spirit all may 
be. Very familiar with the word of God, and close students of such 
books as will best aid them in its unfolding, so far as their means 
will allow, and still closer students in the unwritten book of human 
nature, they ought to wield the Sword of the Spirit with power. 
In this age and country, where the facilities for acquiring knowl- 
edge are so great, every minister of the gospel ought to be a man 



23 



of broad and liberal Christian culture ; and if their exists the dispo- 
sition, there will in some way be found the means to obtain it, 
whether in the usual trodden paths, or in some rougher and more 
unfrequented way. The injunction, "Study to show thyself ap- 
proved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed," is 
not yet obsolete. Whether the field for culture be a large or a lim- 
ited one, it should receive the best possible husbandry. No slip- 
shod labor should ever be offered or accepted. 

We need more enthusiasm in carrying on the work of the Con- 
vention. We need a zeal that will not be turned aside by petty 
obstacles, but weighed down by the magnitude of the enterprise, 
will sweep away the barriers and compel success. 

Lastly, we need more faith in God. Instead of fixing our gaze 
constantly upon the work of our own hands, as though by our 
might or our power, we were to obtain the victory, we need to lift 
up our eyes unto the hills from whence alone cometh our help. 
With all our planting and watering, we are to expect that God will 
give the increase, some thirty, some sixty, and some an hundred 
fold. 

In behalf of the Board, 

K. S. HALL, Secretary. 



REPORTS FROM ASSOCIATIONS. 



Meredith Association. The Meredith Association held its eighty- 
ninth anniversary Sept. 11 and 12, with the church in North Conway.— 
The attendance was small, because of the remoteness of the place, hut the 
meetings were felt to be of much spiritual profit. The little church wel- 
comed the Association with generous hosditality, and with gladness for 
the Lord's favor to them during the year. Their zealous pastor, with the 
aid of the Association^ Committee and other brethren in the State, and 
afterwards of Dea. S. K. Mitchell, of Haverhill, Mass., held protrac'ed 
meetings early in the year, with the result, after a time, of the addition to 
the church of seven by baptism and three by experience, with some in- 
crease of the general interest. 

Baptisms were reported from other churches as follows, viz : 1st Rumney, 
1 ; Danbury, 2; North Sanbornton, 3; Baker's River, Rumney, 1 ; making 
in all for the Association, 14. Fourteen additions by letter and experience 
were reported, also, from five churches. Total increase for the year, 28. 
There were losses in 8 churches ; by death, 16; by exclusion and erasure, 
12; by dismission, 11; total 39. Net loss 11. 

The total resident membership reported in ten churches is 626, or one 
less than the number reported in the same churches last year. Whole 
number of Sabbath School scholars reported, 850. Whole amount report- 
ed for benevolence, $495.75, which is $108.22 less than the amount of 
last year, and is distributed as follows, viz. ; to Foreign Missions, $138.15 ; 
to Home Mission Society, $47.51 ; to the State Convention, $149.37; Bible 
Cause, $11.75; Miscellaneous objects, 148.97. Three students for the 
ministry are members of the church in Danbury. 

The changes in the pastorate have been by the resignation of Rev. J. B. 
Breed, of the 1st Rumney church, to be succeeded by Rev I. W. Coombs, 
and of Rev. H. W. Dalton of the Second Sanbornton church, leaving a 
vacancy not yet filled. 

The general tone of the letters from the churches was one of lamenta- 
tion for declensions and troubles and want of revival. First Sanbornton 
reported interesting meetings with the aid of the workers of the Y. M. C. 
A., but resulting in no increase of the church. Meredith expects to have 
meetings under the same auspices early this year. 

The Baker's River church, of Rumney, reported good revival of the 
church by meetings held with the help of the Committee of the Association 
and other brethren, and gave account of the earnest, though futile efforts 
made during the last two years, for a reconciliation and union of the two 
Baptist churches in that town. 

Special interest in Sunday School work was reported from Woodstock, 
Meredith and North Conway. 

There appeared to be some hope of the church in Hebron, and a Com- 
mittee was again appointed to visit there and at New Hampton. 

The interests of the Woman's Missionary Society were reported by Mrs. 
J. D. Tilton, the Associational Secretary, as feeling thetdepression of the 
"hard times," but yet persistently sustained by some earnest helpers who 
will not give up so good a cause. 



25 

A committee for protracted meetings with churches desiring them, was 
appointed for the year, and the principal committees for the next session 
were again nominated in advance. 

The time of meeting was changed from the second to the first week in 
September, 1879, and Danbury was designated as the place. 

A. V. Tilton. 

Dublin Association. The sixty-ninth anniversary waa held with 
the Baptist church at Peterborough, Sept. 5th and 6th. The weather was 
wet and lowery; yet a large number was present. The utmost harmony 
prevailed, and during the session there were excellent sermons, much 
singing, and good devotional meetings. The spirit of the Master pervad- 
ed all the deliberations. All the churches sent letters, and their material 
and spiritual prosperity seemed to be on the increase. Whole number 
baptized during the year, 33. Received by letter and experience, 20; total 
53. Diminution from all causes, 55, including 14 dropped from the mem- 
bership of the church at Peterborough. Fitzwilliam has settled Rev. Wm. 
Read of Littleton, Mass., in place of Rev. S. Latham. Pottersville has 
settled Rev. J. W. Merrill in place of Rev. C. Newhall. Antrim has re- 
called Rev. E. M. Shaw, the former pastor, and Hinsdale has settled Rev. 
C. A. Piddock, of Claremont. The largest number baptized and received 
by letter during the year were in the Peterborough and Hinsdale churches. 
The Marlow church still continues very small and feeble. The financial 
depression has been more or less felt by all the churches. Rev. J. S. Her- 
rick, the beloved pastor of the church at Troy, is the longest settled of any 
minister in the Association. He has been pastor there more than fourteen 
years. 

The churches of this Association are all holding on their way nobly. — 
The delegates this year seemed full of hope and courage, and determina- 
tion to dedicate themselves more thoroughly to the work of the Lord. 
This Association is blessed with a good and faithlul ministry, composed 
of tried men. In the contributions there was a slight falling off; but con- 
sidering everything, the Association has great cause of rejoicing, hoping, 
and toiling on. 

C. F. Myers. 

Salisbury Association. The sixtieth session of this Association 
convened with the Pleasant Street Church, Concord, September 18 and 
19. Its meetings were well attended and a general good feeling pervaded 
them all. 

Thirteen of the fourteen churches comprising this Association, sent let- 
ters, which were usually of an encouraging nature, The churches report- 
ing baptisms are as follows: Hopkinton, 5; Lake Village, 3; Bow, 8; 
First Concord, 22; Pittsfield, 12; First Fisherville, 29; Pleasant Street, 
Concord, 18; First Franklin Falls, 11. Total number of additions from 
all sources, 261: by baptism, 108; by letter, 122; of this number 94 come 
from the re-union of the Main Street and First Fisherville churches; by 
experience, 29; by restoration, 2; decrease from all sources, 45; gain 216. 
Our benevolent contributions compared with those of last year show a 
slight decrease. All our churches, except Gilmanton and Sutton, are sup- 
plied with pastors. During the year the church at Bow has called to its 
pastorate and ordained Bro. O. W. Kimball. 

The church at Suncook has lost its house of worship, not by mortgage, 
however, but by fire, the work of incendiarism. Its pastor, Rev. Henry 
W. Tate, has secured some generous subscriptions toward the work of re- 
building, which will be commenced at once. 



26 

Pleasant Street. Concord, has been remodelled and enlarged. A com- 
mittee was appointed to aid churches within the limits of this body that 
might desire help in special services. 

An important feature in our Associational gathering this year was the 
discourse showing the "growth and enlargement of the Baptist denomin- 
ation in New Hampshire," with personal reminiscences of its author, de- 
livered by Rev. E. E. Cummings, d. d., who has reached his fiftieth year 
of ministerial life. 

Mrs. Dr. J. N. Murdock was present and gave an impetus to the 
Woman's Missionary work by a very practical and appropriate address. 

E. C. Spinney. 

Milford Association. The fiftieth anniversary was held Sept. 11th 
and 12th, with the church in Milford. Rev. A. Sherwin gave a historical 
address, and a copy of it was requested for publication. Revs. J. C. 
Foster, W. H. Eaton, D. Gage, and J. M. Coburn, who were formerly 
pastors in this Association, were present, and took part in a special service. 
Rev. P. Chamberlin, who was for many years an active member of this- 
body, died during the year. He was a member of the church in Milford. 
Rev. W. R. Warner has left Lyndeborough, and is succeeded by Rev. H. 
G. Hubbard. Bro. J. D. Graham has left Greenville, which is at present 
without a pastor. Rev. F. E. Cleaves has become pastor at New Boston. 
The number of baptisms during the year was 144. Of these there were 
57 at 1st Manchester, 34 at Nashua, and 25 at 2nd Manchester. The ad- 
ditions by letter and experience were 56. The diminutions were 102. Net 
increase, 98. 

Portsmouth Association. The fiftieth anniversary of this Associa- 
tion was held with the church in Dover, Sept. 18th and 19th. The meet- 
ings were well attended, and were marked for their harmony and spirit- 
uality. Letters were read from all the churches excepting Seabrook, 
which sent only statistics. Rev. Geo. S. Chase, of Northwood, has re- 
moved to Vermont, and Rev. E. L. Scott, of Brentwood, now serves as 
pastor at South Hampton. Tbree pastors have entered the Association, 
viz. : Rev. D. Taylor, to Northwood, Rev. J. Clement, to Chester, Rev C. 
Newhall, to Brentwood. One pastor has been removed by death, Rev. 
Horace Eaton, who for a year previous to his death in June last, had sup- 
plied the church in Chester, and rendered them very valuable aid in the 
erection of their new house of worship. At our last Association he spoke 
earnestly and feelingly in behalf of this enterprise. Twelve of the fittsen 
churches report pastors. Two, Stratham and Newton Junction, report a 
stated supply, One, Seabrook, reports itself as without a minister. 

There is a hopeful outlook from all the churches, except Seabrook, which 
has had no meetings since June, and has no prospect of services being 
resumed. 

The church in Chester dedicated its new house of worship in August. 
The church in Dover has made extensive repairs, remodelling the inside 
and beautifying the outside of their house of worship, re-dedicating it in 
September This church, also, observed its 50th anniversary the day pre- 
vious to the convening of the Association. The church in Exeter is great- 
ly bereaved in the death of Dea J. P. Moses, who, for sixty-two years served 
in this office. A praying man, a true and large hearted man, a man of in- 
fluence in church and community has gone from earth to heaven. 

The church in Great Falls, reports great trials, yet they have found them 
much more precious than gold, For nearly six months this church was 
deprived of the labors of its pastor, through sickness. 

The church in Newton by advice of Council ordained in January as their 



27 

pastor, Rev. J. H. Wells. Seven churches report baptisms. Portsmouth 
20; Exeter 10; Plaistow 8; Newton 5; So. Hampton 2; Great Falls 2; 
Chester 1. Additions by baptisms, 48 ; by letter, 34 ; by experience, 1 ; 
total 83. Decrease : by dismission, 22 ; by exclusion, 4; by death, 19; 
total 45 ; net increase, 28 

The Portsmouth church has passed through a precious revival ; the Ex- 
eter church has enjoyed a quiet, but thorough work of grace; all [the 
churches, save one, report services well attended, much interest in the 
preaching of the word, and expressions of an earnest desire for more spir- 
ituality and a deeper work of grace. At the close of the sessions many 
tender reminiscences of the past were called out, with kindly remembrance 
of the faithful men of God who have served this Association well, but 
now gone to their reward. 

Chas. A. Towne. 

Newport Association. This Association held its fiftieth anniversary 
with the church in New London, Sept. 25th and 26th. The semi-centen- 
nial of the Association was celebrated by appropriate exercises. Rev. S. 
C, Fletcher, pastor of the New London church, delivered a deeply impres- 
sive Historical Sermon ; and very interesting reminiscences of the past 
fifty years were given by those interested in its work during that period. 
The fact that Rev. Ira Pearsons, familiarly known as Father Pearsons, 
who was Moderator when the Association was organized fifty years ago, 
was called to preside on this occasion was a striking coincidence, and deep- 
ly impressive. At the age of eighty-seven years, Father Pearsons retains 
in a remarkable manner his physical and mental powers, and he presided 
with great dignity and affability. 

It was a privilege of no ordinary character to listen to the words of re- 
membrance, instruction, and good cheer, such as were expressed by Rev, 
Ira Pearsons, of Newport, Rev. L. Hayden, d. d., Washington, D. C, 
Rev. D. Gage, of Manchester, our beloved State Missionary, Rev. A. P. 
Mason, d. d., of Boston, who addressed us on Home Missions, and Rev. 
J. N. Murdock, d. d., of Boston, who gave us a thrilling account of the 
progress of the gospel among the heathen, and especially of the recent re- 
vival among the Telogocs. No little interest was felt in the fact that the 
Association could celebrate its semi centennial under the shadow of Colby 
Academy, whose high standard of intellectual culture and moral purity, 
has in the past so largely blessed those who have been placed under its 
influence, whife now it is so perfect in all its appointments that it is more 
fully equipped to send its streams of blessings through coming genera- 
tions. 

The churches, fourteen in number, were all, with one or two excep- 
tions, represented by delegates, and reported by letter. While there has 
been no marked revivals in any of the churches during the past year, the 
most of them report a good degree of interest, and an awakening confi- 
dence in the use of divinely appointed means for accomplishing the pur- 
poses of the gospel of Christ. Eight of the churches report baptisms as 
follows: New London, 2; Cornish, 4; Canaan, 1; Hanover, 2; East 
Washington, 3; Claremont, 8; Lyme, 4; Lebanon, 11; total, 35. The 
additions by letter were 25 ; by experience, 8 ; total additions, 68. The 
diminutions, were: Dismissed, 42; Erased, 24; Excluded, 4; Deaths, 30; 
total, 100; making a net loss of 32. All the churches except Canaan, Gosh- 
en, and Unity, are supplied with the stated preaching of the gospel. Sev- 
eral of the brethren who were pastors during the current year, have closed 
their labors with their respective churches, viz. : Rev. H. C. Leavitt, of 
Newport, Rev. W. Hurlin, of Goshen, and Rev. S. S White, of Lyme. 
Two churches of the Association have settled pastors during the year. So. 
Acworth, Bro. J. D. Graham, and Lyme, Rev. E. P. Merrifield, of Ver- 
mont. 



28 

The Woman's Missionary Society still holds a place in the hearts of the 
sisters of our churches. They report a very interesting meeting during 
the Association held in the chapel, which was addressed by Mrs. Dr. Mur- 
dock, of Boston, and Mrs. Dr. Hayden, of Washington, D. C. Their mon- 
ey contributions from five of the churches amount to $119.82. The other 
contributions, reported in the letters from the churches are nearly as fol- 
lows: Foreign Missions, $184.71; Home Missions, $288.50; Convention, 
$315.97 ; Minutes, $34.15 ; Miscellaneous $289.31 ; Home Objects, $5,166,50. 
Total for all purposes, $9,104,61. 

The next meeting of the Association will be held with the church in 
Newport, the fourth Wednesday in Sept., 1879. Thus ends the first fifty 
years of this Association of christian churches, May the God of our fathers 
command the divine benediction upon their children, and may the fifty 
years to come be signalized by the gracious outpouring of the Holy Spirit. 

G. A. Glines. 

White Mountaix Association. The thirty-fifth anniversary was 
held with the church in North Stratford, June 12th and 13th. Was en- 
couraged and helped by the presence of a number of ministers from other 
Associations. Rev. S. A. Read has since then become pastor of the church 
in North Stratford. Rev. S. Dean is still pastor of the church in Lunen- 
burg, Vt., and the other three churches are without pastors. The total 
number of church members in the Association is 161. 



CIRCULAR LETTER. 



BY REV. G. W. KINNEY. 



Brethren of the Convention and Baptists of New Hampshire. — Permit 
me to offer for your consideration, the following subject, with such sugges- 
tions thereon as my poor ability and the limits of this circular will allow — ■ 
"Spiritual Power the present great need of our churches." , 

No one doubts the reality of physical power and world power. Let no 
christian question the reality of a church power, a mighty spiritual force 
that dwells with and operates through the representative body of our as- 
cended Lord, to save a lost world. It is not wealth, numbers, a popular 
ministry, imposing architecture and forms of religious service, material 
prosperity &c, but a potency of spirit as aggressive and irresistible as, the 
light. For this gift of power the Jerusalem church was enjoined by Christ 
to wait, assured that when it should be received it would prepare them for 
the successful conquest of the nations and remain the permanent inheri- 
tance of the true church to the end. 

In Convention, as also throughout the year, we are constantly reminded 
that New Hampshire has from twenty to thirty "feeble Baptist churches," 
whose weak and tottering steps must be supported by the staff of pecuni- 
ary aid which the stronger churches are able to offer. This is well, for 
"their debtors they are." But the fact is "The half was never told." In- 
stead of a score and a half, there are in the State eighty-five Baptist Church- 
es that show unmistakable signs of spiritual impotency. A church may be 
strong in means, talents, and human standards of power, and yet be impo- 
tent to accomplish the purpose for which it was ordained. As Dr. Fish 
well says in his tract on soul-saving— "The Founder of the church has made 
plain its object. It is to convert the world. He came to seek and save 
the lost; and his word is, "As the Father hath sent me into the world, 
even so have I sent you into the world;" i. e. with the same purpose — 
soul-saving." In proof that the poverty of means about which so much is 
said is not the most distressing weakness among us, I will ask you to follow 
me while I undertake to investigate the case somewhat. 

There are seven Associations in the State, having, according to the last 
Convention Minutes, an aggregate membership of 9,044, showing an in- 
crease of 1,015 in the last nine years, an annual average of 112 7-9ths, — 
a gain of one to about 80. Ought not eighty church members— the Lord 



30 



being with them, to be able to gather more than one recruit a year in ex- 
cess of the loss by desertion and death ? But the entire gain in the State 
for the period named was made in three of the Associations, viz : Salis- 
bury, Milford and White Mountain, the other two having lost, — Meredith 
35, and Portsmouth 52. The largest numerical increase is shown in the 
Milford, but more noteworthy is the fact that in the smallest and poorest — 
pardon the word— the White Mountain Association is found the largest 
per cent, of gain in the State on the total membership, it being full 90 per 
cent, greater than in the Milford. 

This leads me to remark that no churches in the State exhibit so re- 
markable growth the nine years past as some of the weak wards of the 
Convention. Poor in means, they have proved rich in faith and good 
fruits. Several have doubled and almost trebled their membership, and 
one has increased almost fourfold, and that not through any considerable 
increase of population, but principally by conversions and baptisms. Thus 
some of what are called "the feeble churches," have given proof of the 
possession of more real spiritual power than has been witnessed in those 
we call "strong." 

Why this is, I will not attempt to say, but would ask whether it is pos- 
sible that the reason maybe found in their more perfect faith and fidelity? 
Conscious weakness fosters a sense of dependence, and this makes true the 
paradox of the Apostle, "When we are weak then are we strong." Cer- 
tain it is that they have commendably imitated the activity and self-denial 
of tire early christians, and unparalleled growth has been the reward. Our 
stronger and self-supporting churches are doing little more than to sustain 
themselves and uphold a formal Christianity, and find it hard to do this, in- 
stead of waging a vigorous and aggressive warfare against the realm of 
darkness, and some of our weak churches are seemingly determined to 
lean hard on the arm of the Convention, as long as it will carry them. 
The churches and ministry want more of the missionary spirit to help the 
weak and build up the waste places. But every church wants a whole min- 
ister, and is not willing to share with another the labors of a better man 
than it can support alone, and some ministers are unwilling to undertake 
to cultivate more than a single small patch in God's vineyard, and that must 
be a bed of roses without thorns. The Lord says to Zion, "Enlarge the 
place of thy tent, * * * spare not, lengthen thy cords and strengthen 
tby stakes," but Zion answers back, "the ropes are out at full length and the 
tent pins are driven as hard as we can drive them." 

In October, 1828, fifty years ago, the Milford Association was formed 
with a total membership of 720. During the ten years that followed there 
were baptised into its fellowship 1,177, or 457 more than it numbered at its 
organization. 

In 1808, ten years ago, that body had a total of 1,732 members, more than 
twice what it had when constituted, yet in this last decade the baptisms 
have been 28G less than in the first, In the first period they were 160 per 
cent, of the original membership. In the latter they are scarcely 51 per 



31 

cent, of the membership in 1863, a difference of 109 per cent. These are 
startling figures. What is their lesson ? Are our churches losing the pow- 
er that was given them in other days ? Was one christian fifty years ago 
worth more than three of the present day to win souls? We claim to 
have a better educated and more thoroughly fitted ministry, more efficient 
organization for christian work and an additional auxiliary force in the 
Sunday School which is regarded only second to the power of the church 
if, indeed, it is not sometimes placed in the first rank, yet we do not equal 
our fathers in efficient service in the spiritual field of battle. 

At Newton, within the present limits of the Portsmouth Association, 
was constituted the first Baptist church in New Hampshire. There, 
was begun that valorous advance of our Baptist fathers in the name 
of the Lord and his truth, which carried the banner of "One Lord, one 
faith, and one baptism" in triumph over the State. Though sternly op- 
posed at various points, our obnoxious faith rapidly won its way, planting 
its churches by the side of those which were already established under 
State patronage and successfully contesting the exclusive claim of the pre- 
occupants of the town-ship parishes. The Lord gave us power to go up 
and possess the land when we were few, feeble and poor. Now we have 
become a host and have wealth and respectability, it is hard work to even 
hold our own. Indeed, going back as far as 1843 and 4, when we had 108 
churches and 10,536 members, 23 more churches and nearly 1500 more mem- 
bers than now, it looks very much as if we had not done this. Surely, breth- 
ren, if we cannot hold what we have gained it is vain for us to think of 
acquiring more. If we cannot gather into vessels the schools of fish that 
are already within our nets, it is useless for us to launch out into the deep 
for a draught. 

Why is it, with all the modern improvements and appliances calculated 
to equip man for greater efficiency in all branches of service, that our 
churches are not equal to those of half a century ago as converting agen- 
cies ? It would seem they ought to wield far greater power to-day per 
capita than then, Has the mine in which we delve become exhausted? 
Has the harvest nearly all been gathered so that the sheaves are few and 
small? Is society so completely evangelized that there remains only 
^'here and there a traveller on the broad road to death?" 

Doubtless a variety of apologies may be offered, but I think none that 
will fully meet the case. Should it be said there are more churches of var- 
ious denominations of christians to claim the fealty of the population and 
sharein the spoils of christian victory, I reply, instead of diminishing, this 
should rather increase the success of every branch of the gospel army. — 
Should it be said that there is a growing disregard of the Sabbath and disin- 
clination to attend public worship ; that as stated recently in a convention, 
infidelity is on the increase and the church is losing her power over adult 
minds and must hereafter gather her recruits from the ranks of childhood 
and youth, then I reply this is confessing that the church is weak and fails 
to fulfil her mission. She has committed to her, a gospel which is the 



32 

power of God to save every one who believes, and powerful enough to 
overcome unbelief in th * hearts of men. Let her gird on the whole armor 
of God, bring up her reserve strength and charge all along the line against 
the enemy. If she does, victory will perch on her banners as sure as the 
Lord fights for his people. 

From the N. II. Gazetteer, I learn that the leading evangelical denomi- 
nations in the State, other than the Baptists, had fyrty-eight churches less 
in 1870 than in 1860. Total number of evangelical churches, including 
Baptist, in 1870, 517. The average of baptisms into our churches for the 
last nine years is three hundred and seventy-four. Allowing that all the 
evangelical churches are equally fortunate in accessions, we have a total 
annual addition to the christian population of the State of 2,244. From 
the same source I learn that 4,214 persons died in the State in 1870. This- 
may be a little above or it may be below the average, — I have not the means- 
of determining,— but it is clear that from 1,500 to 2,000 more persons die 
every year than are reached by the saving power of the churches. This is 
not a particularly encouraging fact. Our churches are full of talent, which if 
consecrated to the Lord and put into service for his glory, might be preach- 
ing and singing the gospel to sinners in every school house in the State. 
But here lies the great secret, of the loss of power and want of suc- 
cess on the part of our churches. It is not that we have not money 
enough to support the appointments of the gospel ; nor that we have not 
numbers sufficient to justify a more aggressive warfare ; nor is it want of in- 
telligence, capacity or ability on the part of the ministry or membership ; 
but it is the utter absence of any idea of personal responsibility for the con- 
version of sinners from the mind of most members of our churches, and an 
absolute want of the spirit of consecration to the Master. Worldliness 
has bound hand and foot the energies of the church. Scarcely one mem- 
ber in twenty has any definite thought or purpose of being the instrument 
under God of the conversion of even one sinner, notwithstanding the re- 
ward promised. If it be taken for granted, that all in the churches are 
regenerate because thay have professed the fact, though it by no means 
insures it — it is sufficiently apparent that all are not consecrated. jSTot 
to allude to the inconsistent class, let me ask : Wherein do multitudes in 
our churches, who live sober an d irreproachable lives, differ from the moral 
and upright men of the world ? They never go after the lost sinner to 
seek his salvation, nor are their voices ever heard in prayer or proclaim- 
ing the message of good news to lost men. Rarely do they attend the 
covenant and prayer meeting. On the other hand they pursue the world 
with as evident zeal and relish as the men who lay no claim to piety. A 
christian who has no yearning for souls and neglects almost every religious 
duty is one of the strangest anomalies the sun shines upon, yet many such 
there are in the churches if we are to believe their professions. Then 
there are many that keep up the forms of godliness whose lives are pow- 
erless as spiritual agencies, so that very few actually watch for souls as 



33 



though they were charged with the duty of looking after their eternal 
state. 

Dr. Fish, in the tract before referred to, says, "I have seen it stated that 
not one in five of all professors add perceptibly to the efficiency of the 
churches. Then there are thousands of christians who have yet to count 
their first convert to Cbrist; yea, who have yet to make their first honest 
effort to save a soul." What if the whole five-fifths, or even four-fifths 
were to throw their activities in the direction which the commission given 
to the church points ? The record of the acts of the apostles describes 
some of the results that might be expected to follow. "And at that time 
— the martyrdom of Stephen — there was a great persecution against the 
church at Jerusalem ; and they were all scattered abroad throughout the 
regions of Judea and Samaria except the apostles. * * * * Therefore, 
they — the common disciples — that were scattered abroad, went everywhere 
preaching the word." Philip preached Christ with great success at Sama- 
ria, "And there was great joy in that city." A little later it is recorded, 
"Now they which were scattered abroad upon the persecution that arose 
about Stephen, travelled as far as Phenice, Cyprus and Antioch, preach- 
ing the word to none but to the Jews only. And some of them were 
men of Cyprus and Cyrene, which, when they were come to Antioch, 
spake unto the Grecians, preaching the Lord Jesus. And the hand of 
the Lord was with them, and a great number believed and turned unto the 
Lord:' 

How much this reads like the history of the Baptist movement in 
this State a century ago. The Lord is the same now, human hearts 
are the same, the Holy Spirit has not been recalled. He is even now con- 
vincing thousands of sin, who, if they could but hear the voice of the 
church saying to them, "Come," would enter at once the open door of 
grace. 

Go out then, over our Granite hills, ye heralds of the cross, go out 
into the highways and byways, into the school districts and homes of the 
people, all of you who have been called to be saints, and proclaim to every 
rational creature the glad tidings of salvation through Christ. Men of 
Israel of all ranks, help, help now to make every Baptist church in the 
State a soul-saving power. Let each one of our over 9000 members go 
'prayerfully, tearfully, wisely and patiently to work to save at least one soul 
the coming year, beginning the work at once, and we will come to our next 
anniversary rejoicing over such numbers saved as no past twelve months 
has witnessed. Do you look upon this to be a Utopian task ? Some of 
God's most humble archers have done far more than bring down one sin- 
ner in a year's time. You cannot tell but the Lord may give you more 
than one soul, until you try. But all doubts as to the wisdom of the un- 
dertaking and the possibility of success are put to silence by the word of 
the Lord, which declares that "He who converts a sinner from -the error 
of his way, will save a soul from death and will hide a multitude of sins.' 



34 



Vastly good and vastly great this work which you may do, disciple of 
Jesus ! Save a soul ! Hide a multitude of sins ! Covet the deed, and i n 
the name of thy Lord attempt it. and if your faith does not fail you will 
succeed. 



ORDAINED BAPTIST MINISTERS IN THE STATE. 



Adams, P. S.. Newport. 
Alden, W. II , Portsmouth. 
Anderson, S. 11., Easl Washington. 
Barnes, L. C., Greenville. 
Barnes. L.M.. New Ipswich. 
Barry, Royal. Carroll. 
Breed. J. i'>., Rumney Depot. 
Bromley, E., Pittsfie'ld. 
Brown, Amasa, Newton. 
Bunker. V. E., North Sanbornton. 
Burgess, I. J., Hampton Falls. 
Chase, J. N., Exeter. 
Cleaves. F. F., New Boston. 
Clement, Joshua, Laconia. 
Coburn.J.M., Pittsfield. 
Coker, J.. Fast Weare. 
Coombs, I. W.. Rumney. 
Coombs, S., Fish ervi lie. 
Crocker, W., Fast Canaan. 
Cummings, F. F., Concord. 
Dean, L. J., Fast Jaffrey. 
Dearborn, D. 31., New Hampton. 
Doming, D. P., Plainfield. 
Eaton, W. H .. Kcene. 
Eastman, T. B.. North Sutton. 
Emery. E. J., West Swanzey. 
Fielden, J. F., Franklin Falls. 
Fletcher, S. C, New London. 
Fuller, O. P.. Plaistow. 
Gage, D., Manchester. 
Garner, W. V., Concord. 
Gleason. T. C., North Conway. 
Glines. G. A.. Cornish Flat. 
Hall, K.S., Lake Village. 
Heald. A., Meriden. 
Her rick, J. S., Troy. 
Hooper, N.. Exeter. 
Hopkins, A. J . Dunbarlon. 
Hubbard. H. G , South Lyndeboro. 
Hurlin. w., Antrim. 
Kimball, O. W., Bow. 
Kinney, G. W., Hudson Center. 
Lea veil, W. H.. Manchester. 
Leavitt, 11. C. Newport. 
Lerned, J. IF, Amherst. 
Libbey, W., Fast Wilton. 
Mayhew. W. M., Woodstock. 



Mcrriam. F., Danbury. 
Merrifield, E. P., Lyme Center. 

Mcrriman.T. M., Meredith Village. 

Merrill,. I. W., Pottersville. 

Mitchell, .1. B., Hinsdale. 

Moody, R. B., Milford. 

Newhall, C, Epping, 

Nichols. C. K.. Bradford. 

Nichols, J. H , Goffstown Tenter. 

Nicholson. G. W., Nashua. 

Pearson. Ira, Newport. 

Piddock. C. A., Hinsdale. 

Pepper. F., Bradford. 

Poland. J. W ., Goffstown Center. 

Rankin. F. VV. A.. Sanbornton. 

Read, S. A.. Coos. 

Read r W., Fitzwiliiam. 

Richardson. D. F.. Hanover. 

Scott, F. b., South Hampton. 

Shaw. E. M.. Antrim. 

Sherwin. A.. Manchester. 

Smith. F. H., Hanover. 

Smith, G. B., West Plainfield. 

Smith, W. 15, Fisherville. 

Spinnev, E. C, Concord. 

Stevens, L. C. Great Falls. 

Stewart, W. lb, Exeter. 

Stoddard, D. H., Great Falls. 

Stowell, A. S.. Salem Depot. 
Streeter. H. B.. Hinsdale. 
Strong. .1. F.. Manchester. 
Swaim. J. S.. Claremont. 
Tate, H. W. . Suncook. 
Taylor. D., East North wood. 
Tilden, N. F., Lebanon. 
Tilton. A. V.,Campton Village. 
Tilton,.). 1).. Rumney. 
Towne, C. A.. Dover. 
Tucker. W.S., Hopkinton. 
Upton, J., Fpping. 
Walker, H, ().. Deerfield Center. 
Walker. W. H.. Warner. 
Wells. J. H.. Newton. 
White. S. S., South Hampton. 
Whittemore, J. L., Richmond. 
Wing. ()., Newton Junction. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE ASSOCIATIONS. 



Article 1. This Association shall be composed of ministers and messengers, not ex- 
ceeding five to a church, who shall be members of the church which they represent, 
and shall be known under the name which it shall place at the head of its minutes, at 
the first session after the adoption of this constitution. 

Art. 2. The object of this association shall be the promotion of the intimate fellow- 
ship of the churches, and the increase of experimental, doctrinal, and practical piety. 
It may open and continue correspondence with other associations and ecclesiastical 
bodies, as it shall judge proper ; and shall have power to regulate its own concerns, and, 
in general, to transact any business necessary to carry out its objects. It shall meet at 
such time and place as shall be agreed upon by vote. 

Art. 3. At the opening of each session, the clerk of the preceding year, or, in his 
absence, the oldest settled pastor present, shall call the meeting to order, and preside till, 
by a plurality of votes by ballot, which may elect, a moderator shall be chosen. The 
moderator shall then call far a clerk and treasurer to be chosen in the same manner; 
but an assistant clerk and auditors may be chosen by acclamation or other sign. The 
moderator shall preside at all meetings, maintain order, and nominate all committees, 
unless otherwise ordered. The clerk shall keep a fair and impartial record of all doings 
of the association, prepare them for the press, and obey all orders in respect to their 
disposition. The treasurer shall keep all moneys aud effects of the association paid in 
for charitable or other purposes, and dispose of them according to the wish of the 
donors, or the direction of the association. At each session, immediately after the 
choice of officers, public worship shall be held, at the close of Avhich a collection may 
be taken for the widows and children of Baptist ministers, deceased within this body. 

Art. 4. Churches may be received into this association on application by letter, and 
furnishing satisfactory evidence of their union with us in the summary of faith aud 
practice, as published by the New Hampshire Baptist Convention, and their willingness 
to conform to the rules of this body; whereupon the moderator shall give one of its 
messengers the right-hand of fellowship. Any church shall be at liberty to discontinue 
its connection with the association, by asking dismission from it, which shall be con- 
sidered no breach of fellowship. Any church neglecting to report to the association for 
two successive years, shall be visited by a committee, to ascertain its condition, and to 
give advice and assistance, which committee shall make a report of facts at the next 
session. Whilst as an association we disclaim all power over the churches, as respects 
their independence and discipline, we claim the right to drop any church which may 
become corrupt in doctrine or practice, and to publish our reasons for so doing. 

Art. 5. Every church shall send, with its pastor and messengers, to the association, 
annually, a letter giving an account of its condition, particularly statingits statistics of 
membership, and whatever may relate to its internal or external affairs. It shall also 
forward, at the same time, its porportion of money for publishing the minutes. 

Art. 6. This association shall be a missionary society, auxiliary to the New Hamp- 
shire Baptist Convention, through which the churches connected with it may convey 
their moneys or other charities to aid foreign and domestic missions, the education of 
young men called to the ministry, or other benevolent objects ; and a portion of the 
time at each session may be given to these subjects. 

Art. 7. Any association may propose an amendment to this constitution, and send 
its proposal to the other associations; and when the amendment shall have been ap- 
proved by a majority vote in each of two thirds of the associations, it shall be consid- 
ered a part of the constitution. 



RULES OF ORDER. 



1 . Every meeting shall be opened and closed by prayer. 

2. Ministers present invited to a seat with us, may speak on all subjects, but vote on 
none. 

3. No subject shall be discussed without motion first made and seconded. 

4. No person shall speak oftener than twice upon the same motion, without permis- 
sion of the moderator. 

5. Motions made and lost shall not be recorded upon the minutes, unless so ordered. 

6. If, when a motion has been made and seconded, a member objects to its discussion, 
the moderator shall immediately put the question, Shall this motion be discussed? 
If the question be negatived, the subject shall then be dismissed. 

7. If any proposition or motion under debate contain two or more points, it shall be 
divided, at the request of any member. 

8. All new and unusual matters intended for the association shall first be submitted 
to the committee of arrangements, and their presentation shall be subject to the decision 
of that committee. 

9. On the opening of the business meeting, on the second day, the names of the mes- 
sengers from the churches shall be read, and the names of those who have not been 
present during the session shall be struck off, except in the case of licentiates and min- 
isters, whose absence shall be denoted by a mark. 

10. The minutes shall be leisurely read and corrected before the close of the association. 

11. The constitution, with these rules, shall be distinctly read from the chair, imme- 
diately after the organization of the association. 



MINUTES OF ASSOCIATIONS. 



MEREDITH ASSOCIATION. 
Formed 1789. 

North Conway, Sept. 11, 1878, 

1*. The Meredith Association met with the church in North Conway r 
and was called to order by the Clerk at 10 o'clock A. M. 

2. Rev. F. Merriam was chosen Moderator, Rev. A. Y. Tilton, Clerk 
and Treasurer, and Bro. C. G. Webster, Auditor. 

3. Prayer was offered by Rev. D. H. Stoddard, of Great Falls. 

4. The Constitution and Rules of Order were read by the Clerk. 

5. The usual invitation was extended to visiting brethren. There were 
present Rev. J. N. Murdock, d. d., of Boston, Corresponding Secretary of 
the A. B. Missionary Union ; Rev. D. H. Stoddard, of the Portsmouth 
Association ; and Rev. J. F. Fielden, of the Salisbury. 

6. The History of the church in Danbury was read by the pastor, Rev. 
F. Merriam, and was accepted to be placed on file. 

7. Vacancies in Committees appointed last year were filled and new 
Committees were appointed as follows : 

On Temperance— Rev. T. M. Merriman. 

On State Convention — Rev. J. D. Tilton, Bro. S. H. Dow. 

On State of Religion— Hey. T. C. Gleason, Dea. A. Kimball, Rev. V. E, 
Bunker. 

On Ministerial Education — Rev. A. V. Tilton. 

On Benevolence— Rev. J. F. Fielden. Breth. J. B. Huse and O. E, 
Brown. ' 

On Woman' s Missionary Society — Mrs. J. N. Murdock, Mrs. J. D. 
Tilton, Mrs. O. E. Brown. 

On Arrangements for next Session — Rev. T. M. Merriman, Breth. F. 
Spencer and S. H. Dow. 

On changing time of Annual Session — Rev. V. E. Bunker, Breth. J. B. 
Huse and O. E. Brown. 

On Finance— Bro. S, H. Dow, Deas. A. Kimball and A. Canny. 

8. At 11 o'clock suspended business to listen to the Annual Sermon, 
which, in the absence of both appointees, was preached by Rev. T. M. 
Merriman, from Luke 12: .32; Subject: "The God-given share of the Bap- 
tists in the Possession and the work of Acquisition of the Kingdom of 



37 

Heaven among men." Rev. J. F. Fielden conducted the devotional ex- 
ercises. 

9. A collection was taken for the Widows and Orphans' Fund, amount- 
ing to #4.03. 

10. The letter from this church welcoming the Association, was then 
read, after which the 

11. Committee of Arrangements reported orders of Exercises, substan- 
tially as follows in these records. 

12. The letter from the First Sanbornton Church was next read, after 
which the meeting was adjourned with prayer by Dr. Murdock. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

13. The Association met again at 2 o'clock, and was opened with prayer 
by Rev. J. D. Tilton. 

14. The reading of the letters from the churches was resumed and com- 
pleted in order. 

15. The first question in order for discussion having been dispensed 
with by vote, the next was taken up, viz : "What is the Bible Plan for 
raising Funds for Church Purposes?" and was discussed earnestly, by 
Brethren Bunker, Dow, Fielden, Stoddard, and J. D. Tilton, until half 
past five o'clock, when it was referred to a committee for resolutions. 

1(3. The ladies retired at 3 o'clock to Academy Hall, to hold a meeting 
in the interest of the Woman's Missionary Society, under charge of the 
Association al Secretary, Mrs. J. D. Tilton, and were addressed by Mrs. 
Dr. Murdock. 

17. After prayer by the Clerk, the Association adjourned. 

EVENING SESSION. 

18. A prayer meeting, led by Bro. O. E. Brown, was held from half past 
seven to eight o'clock, after which 

19. Dr. Murdock preached from Acts 13: 2-4; Subject: "The Combined 
Agency of the Holy Spirit and the Churches in Christian Missions." Rev^ 
J. D. Tilton assisted in the devotional exercises. 

20. Adjourned with prayer by Rev. T. M. Merriman. 

THURSDAY FORENOON. 

21. A prayer meeting at 9 o'clock was led by Rev. J. F. Fielden, 

22. Business was resumed at 9.45, prayer being offered by Rev. Y. E. 
Bunker. 

23. The list of delegates present was read by the Clerk. 

24. And it was voted that the Moderator appoint in advance the Com- 
mittees for the next annual session. 

25. The Committee on Temperance reported by Rev. T. M. Merriman, 
as follows : 

"Whereas, The chief hindrance to the triumph of the Temperance Re- 



38 

form is in the licensed and unlicensed sale of intoxicating drinks: there- 
fore, 

Resolved, That we, the representatives of the Baptist churches of this 
Association, declare, that, in our opinion, it is the duty of all good citizens 
to use all their influence to oppose all sale of spirituous liquors, as lever- 
ages, with all the restraints known to civil law." 

After remarks, the report was adopted with the following amendment, 
offered by Bro. S. H. Dow,— "Regarding the use of tobacco as destructive 
alike to purity, vigor and strength, we deem it the duty of all christians to 
abstain from its use." 

26. The Committee on the State of Religion, reported by Rev. T. C. 
Gleason, that in view of the small number of conversions reported, with 
the lamentation for trials and spiritual barrenness of some of the churches, 
these passages of Holy Writ are monitory, "Let him that thinketh he 
standeth, take heed lest he fall," and "Bring all the tithes into the store- 
house, and prove me now herewith, saith the Lord of Hosts, if I will not 
open to you the windows of heaven and pour you out a blessing," — and 
the report was adopted. 

27. Voted, To dispense with a report on Ministerial Education. 

28. The report on Benevolence was presented with earnest remarks by 
Bro. O. E. Brown, and after spirited discussion by Brethren Fielden, 
Stoddard, Bunker, Merriman, A. V. Tilton and S. H. Dow, was adopted 
as follows : 

" Whereas, God never demands more than what He gives ability for, and 
we are to 'fear not,' believing 'it is our Father's good pleasure to give us 
the Kingdom,' therefore, 

Resolved, That it is our imperative duty to promptly respond to the de- 
mands of the Great Head of the church for the needs of*the constantly 
enlarging work of christian missions." 

29. The Committees on arrangements for next session united in the fol- 
lowing report, which, after discussion, was finally adopted, viz. : 

That the place be Banbury ; the time the first week in September, 1879: 
the preacher of the Annual Sermon, Rev. T. C. Gleason, alternate Rev. L 
W. Coombs; of the Doctrinal Sermon, Rev. W. M. Mayhew, alternate 
>Rev. J. D. Tilton. 

30. At 11 o'clock Rev. A. V. Tilton preached the Doctrinal Sermon on the 
Perseverance of the Saints, from 2d Timothy, 2: 19, Rev. D. H. Stoddard 
assisting in the devotional exercises. 

31. Adjourned after the sermon, with prayer by Bro. Stoddard. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

;52. Met again at 2 o'clock, and opened with prayer by Rev. T. C. Glea- 
son. 

33. The chair announced the Committees for the next annual session, 
as follows: 

On Arrangements — Rev. P. Merriam, Deas. Huntoon and Danforth. 

On State of Religion— Revs. J. D. Tilton, T. C. Gleason, Bro. S. H. 
Dow. 



39 

On Temperance — Rev. F. W. A. Rankin, Bro. J. B, Huse, Bro. F. Spen- 
cer. 

On State Convention— ~Rev. A. V. Tilton, Dea. I. Woodman, Dea. A. 
Kimball. 

On Benevolence — Rev. V. E. Bunker, Dea. A. Canny, Dea. L. Seavey. 

On Woman's Missionary Society — Mrs. J. D. and A. Y. Tilton, Mrs. 
W. M. Mayhew- 

34. A Committee'was also appointed to co-operate with the churches in 
holding special meetings when desired as follows : Revs, J, D, and A, Y, 
Tilton, T. C. Gleason,' T. M. Merriman and Y. E. Bunker. 

35. The Committee on Finance reported by Bro. S. H. Dow, that the 
contributions and the collection for the Widows and Orphans' Fund, 
amounting to $7, be paid to Sister B. Pierce, ot North Conway; and, that 
the churches pay five cents per member for the Minutes. Adopted. ($7. 
additional was subsequently collected for Sister Pierce by Mrs. Dow of the 
Campton church, and forwarded.) 

36. A report in regard to the delinquent churches of Hebron and New 
Hampton was given by Rev. J. D. Tilton, followed with remarks by Rev. 
Y. E. Bunker, with recommendation of continued labor to procure reports 
and histories from these churches next year if possible. This was adopted, 
and Revs. J. D. Tilton and Y. E. Bunker were appointed to the work. 

37. The report on the work of the State Convention was presented by 
Rev. J. D. Tilton, with important statements in regard to the compara- 
tive neglect of this interest by many of the churches, and, after remarks 
by Rev, J. F. Fielden, was adopted as follows : 

"Whereas, Several of the churches of this Association still need help in 
sustaining the Gospel, and, 

Whereas, These, and others of our churches have been greatly aided 
and encouraged in years past by our State Convention ; therefore, 

Besolved, That, acknowledging our debt of gratitude, we are still obli- 
gated to contribute as much as, or more than in time past to its funds so 
that the churches in our own Association and other parts of the State may 
be sustained, and also new churches may be planted where needed," 

38. The report of the Woman's Missionary Society, by Mrs. J. D. Tilton, 
was. received and adopted as follows: "That, although no new Circles have 
been formed during the year, and those already existing, have felt very 
much the stringency of the 'limes,' yet there is an unabated interest in the 
hearts of many earnest women which allows no thought of discouragemen 
or failure." 

39. At 3 o'clock a sermon was preached by Rev. J. F. Fielden, on Christ's 
Example in the Sacrifice of Self, Rev. J. D. Tilton assisting in the devo- 
tional exercises. * 

40. The Minutes were read by the Clerk, and corrected,and it was voted 
that he condense them, at discretion, for printing. 

41. The question, "How shall the piety of the Churches be increased?" 
was taken up and discussed by Rev. Y. E. Bunker, and then laid upon the 
table. 

42. Voted, That the Clerk report the Association to the meeting of the 
State Convention, and by him 



40 

•Jo. To request Histories, to be read at the next session, from the 
churches in Hebron, Campton and Meredith. 

44. Voted, Hearty thanks to the church and people of North Conway 
for their generous hospitality. 

45. Adjourned with prayer by Bro. O. E. Brown. 

THURSDAY EVENING. 

40. A prayer meeting was held, conducted by the Clerk, until 8 o'clock, 
when 

47. A sermon was preached by Rev. J. D. Tilton, from 1st Peter, 3: 3, on 
the Gospel Ideal of Womanhood. Rev. V. E. Bunker assisted in the de- 
votional exercises. 

48. After disposition of unfinished business, fitting remarks were made 
by Rev. Y. E. Bunker, the Moderator being absent, and the Association , 
by vote, adjourned to meet at Danbury on the first Wednesday in Septem- 
ber, 1879. 

49. Prayer and benediction by the Clerk. 

F. MERRIAM, Moderator. 
A. V. Tilton, Clerk. 



DUBLIN ASSOCIATION. 
Formed 1809. 



Peterborough, Sept. 5, 1878. 

1. The Association was called to order by Rev. C. F. Myers, the Clerk 
of last year, at 10 A. M. Half an hour was spent in prayer and confer- 
ence. 

2. A ballot for officers was then taken, with the following result: Mod- 
erator, Rev. W. H. Eaton, d. d. ; Clerk, Rev. C. F. Myers, a. b. ; Assist- 
ant Clerk, Rev. E. M. Shaw, A. b. ; Treasurer, Jos. Hammond, Esq. 

3. The Moderator read the Rules of Order. 

4. The pastors present were, Revs. E. J. Emery, W. H. Eaton, C. A- 
Piddock, C. F. Myers, E. M. Shaw, L. J. Dean, J. W. Merrill and J. L. 
Whittemore. 

5. Voted, To invite visiting ministers to a seat with us. The following 
brethren accepted the invitation: Rev. A. Pollard, d. d., of the Baptist 
Publication Society ; Rev. D. Gage, Agent for the N. II. Baptist Conven- 
tion; and Revs. Metsrs. Harrison and Fell, Methodist ministers. 

6. The Annual Sermon was preached by Rev. W. H. Eaton, d. d., and 
Rev. E. J. Emery assisted in the devotional exercises. Singing by the 
choir. 

7. A collection was taken for the Widows and Orphans' Fund, amount- 
ing to $5.30. 

8. The following committees were appointed: 



41 



X)n Arrangements— Bro. C. Wilder, Rev. E. M. Shaw, Bro. J. P. Pierce. 

On Circular Letter— Hevs. L. J. Dean, J. W. Merrill, Bro. D. H. Good- 
elL 

On State of Beligion — Bevs. J. L. Whittemore, C. F. Myers, Bro. M. 
Wilson. 

On Beneficence — Revs. E. M. Shaw, W. Read, Bro. M. A. Brown. 

On Next Session — Revs. E. J. Emery, W. H. Eaton, Bro. W. A. Horton. 

On Temperance — Revs. C. A. Piddock, L. J. Dean, Bro. H. A. Firmin. 

9. Heard the letter of welcome from the church at Peterborough. 

10. Adjourned at 12.30 o'clock P. M., after prayer by the Moderator. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

11. Met at 1,30 o'clock for a devotional meeting, conducted by Rev. E. 
J. Emery. A goodly number of brethren participated in this meeting. 

12. At 2 o'clock, prayer was offered by Rev. E. M. Shaw. The reading 
of the letters was resumed, and continued till the whole were read. The 
letters were full of hope and determination to go forward in the good 
work. During the year, 33 have been added by baptism, and 20 by letter 
and experience. This is a gain over last year. The Peterborough and 
Hinsdale churches have added the most. 

13. At 3 o'clock, the sisters withdrew to French's Hall, and held a very 
interesting Missionary Meeting, which continued three quarters of an 
hour. Papers were read by Mrs. W. H. Eaton, and Mrs. L. J. Dean. Re- 
ports were made by sisters from most of the churches. 

In the meantime, a general Conference was held by the Brethen, in re- 
gard to the progress of religion in the churches. 

14. At 3.45 o'clock, Rev. C. A. Piddock preached an interesting and in- 
structive sermon. Text, Rev. 20: 12. — "And the Books were Opened." 

15. Adjourned at 4.30 o'clock, after prajer. 

EVENING- SESSION. 

10. Met at 6.30 o'clock. Praise and prayer meeting for half an hour, led 
by Bro. Plummer Pierce. 

17. At 7 o'clock, the Association was called to order by the Moderator ; 
prayer was offered by Rev. J. W. Merrill, and there was singing by the 
choir. 

18. A sermon was preached by Rev. E. M. Shaw. Theme : "What is it 
to serve our present age?" 

19. Bro. C. Wilder reported for the Committee of Arrangements, and 
the report was adopted. 

Adjourned after prayer by Rev. E. M. Shaw. 

FRIDAY MORNING. 

20. Rev. J. L. Whittemore conducted a thirty minutes' prayer meeting. 



42 



At 9.30 o'clock, the Association was called to order, and sung the song be- 
ginning: "The mistakes of my life have been many;" and Bro. Jos. Ham- 
mond offered prayer. 

21. The Committee on Circular Letter reported that the appointee had 
removed from the Association, and that the alternate was sick. Accepted, 

22. The Committee on Beneficence reported, through Rev. E. M. Shaw. 
"In view of the signal manner in which God has blessed the various 

benevolent enterprises of his church, and is just now crowning with won- 
derful success our work in foreign fields, 

Resolved, That we cannot afford any retrenchment in these directions 
for the year to come. We recommend the N. H. Baptist Convention, the 
Missionary Union, the Home Mission Society, and the Publication Society, 
to the earnest, prayerful and liberal support of the churches. Let them 
attempt greater things, and hope for greater things. We also recognize 
with devout gratitude the growing aid of the Woman's Missionary Society, 
and commend its good work." 

23. The Committee on next session reported through Rev.W. H.Eaton. 
We recommend that the next session of the Association be held with 

the church in Troy, that Rev. E. J. Emery preach the sermon, and Rev. 
C, F. Myers be%lternate; that Rev. J. L. Whittemore write the Circular 
Letter, and Rev. E. M. Shaw be alternate. 

24. The Committee on Temperance reported through Rev. C. A. Pid- 
dock : 

" Whereas, We, as an Association, realize in some degree the enormity 
of intemperance, and its blasting influence, therefore, 

Resolved, That in our opinion, the church of Christ is the only organ- 
ization which can be depended on to permanently advance the principles 
of total abstinence. 

Resolved, That Christ is the only hope of the drunkard, and that our 
churches should hold up no lower standard to be followed. 

Resolved, That in the future we will strive more fully to occupy this 
high position, and more faithfully to carry forward this work. 

25. The Committee on the state of Religion reported: 

That all the eleven churches of the Association have been represented. 
Ail have pastors except Marlow. Two or three churches have enjoyed 
revival influences, and nearly all manifest a hopeful spirit, notwithstand- 
ing the financial depression. Some of the churches feel the loss by death 
of much esteemed members. Two pastors have resigned, Rev. C. New- 
hall, of Pottersville, who is succeeded by Rev. J. W. Merrill, and Rev. S. 
Latham, of Fitzwiliiam, who is succeeded by Rev. Win, Read, of Littleton, 
Mass. 

26. The Treasuper of the Widows and Orphans* Fund reported as fol- 
lows : 

THE TRUSTEES OF THE WIDOWS AND ORPHANS' FUND IN ACCOUNT WITH 
THE DUBLIN BAPTIST ASSOCIATION. 

Sept. 6, 1877. To deposits in Cheshire Prov. Ins. for 

Savings July 1, 1877 .$094. 20 

" " " Cash received at last Session 17.40 

July 1, 1878. " Interest on deposit in Saw Ins 8(5.01 

$747.07 



43 



CONTRA. 

Sept. 6, 1878. By amount in the hands of Trustees $747.67 



$747.67 

W. H. Eaton, \ Trustees. 

E. J. Emery, 

Having attended to the duty assigned us, we find this account properly 
vouched and cast. 

27. Rev. D. Gage spoke for half an hour in regard to State work in the 
Baptist churches, 

28. Eev. A. Pollard, d. d., spoke in behalf of the Baptist Publication 
Society. 

29. A vote of thanks was passed to the Peterborough church for its 
generous and ample hospitality. 

30. The Moderator spoke for 25 minutes, showiug how the gospel as 
held by the Baptists, has extended itself in New Hampshire, and over 
the world. The choir rendered a beautiful selection. 

31. Voted, To adjourn to meet with the church at Troy on the first 
Thursday of September, 1879. 

Benediction by the Moderator. 

W. H. EATON, Moderator. 
C. F. Myers, Clerk. 



SALISBURY ASSOCIATION. 
Formed 1818. 

Concord, Sept. 18, 1878. 

1. The sixtieth annual session of the Salisbury Baptist Association, 
convened at 10.15 A. M., with the Pleasant Street Church. 

2. The Association was called to order by the Clerk of the previous 
year. 

3. The organization was effected by the choice of the following officers : 
Moderator, Rev. W. B. Smith; Clerk, Rev. E. C. Spinney, Assistant 
Clerk, Rev. A. J. Hopkins ; Treasurer, J. S. Brown ; Auditors, Dea. J. 
Currier, H. S. Fairbanks. 

4. In the absence of J. S. Brown, Dea. J. Currier was appointed Treas- 
urer pro tern. 

5. Prayer was offered by Rev. E. E. Cummings, d. d. 

6. The Constitution and Rules of Order were read by the Moderator. 

7. Invitation to visiting brethren was accepted by the following persons : 
Rev. D. Taylor, Portsmouth Association; Rev. Lucian Hayden, d. d., 
Washington, D. C; Rev. Arthur W. H. Eaton, Cambridge, Mass.; Rev. 
J. N. Murdock, d. d., Secretary of Missionary Union, Boston, Mass. 



44 



8. Committee of Arrangements — Revs. E. C. Spinney, K. S. Hall, H. W. 
Tate. 

9. Report of Treasurer submitted ; voted to accept and adopt. 

10. Bro. J. S. Brown, Trustee of Widows and Orphans' Fund, made his 
report, which was adopted. 

11. Bro. J. S. Brown was appointed to act as Trustee of the Widows 
and Orphans' Fund for the ensuing year. 

12. The letter from the Pleasant Street Church was read. 

13. Committee on Next Session — Revs. J. F. Fielden, J. Coker, K. S. 
Hall. 

14. Committee on Resolutions — Revs. E. Pepper, W. S. Tucker, Edwin 
Bromley. 

15. Committee of Arrangements reported in part. 

16. The Annual Sermon was preached by Rev. W. B. Smith, Text, John 
2:5; theme, "The moral necessity of instant, unquestioning obedience, as 
the great principle of Christian duty." Devotional exercises conducted by 
Rev. J. F. Fielden. 

17. The annual collection for Widows and Orphans' Fund was taken, 
amounting to .$14.66. 

18. The matured report of the Committee of Arrangements was made 
and adopted. 

19. Adjourned with prayer by Dea. A. Hamilton. 

AFTERNOON. 

20. Convened at 1 P. M. Prayer by Rev. Edwin Bromley. 

21. Singing. 

22. Letters from the churches were read. 

23. Historical address by Rev. E. E. Cummings, d. d. Text, Ps. 116; 7 ; 
Theme, "The growth of the Baptist Denomination in New Hampshire," 
with personal reminiscences of the speaker. Rev. Dr. Lucian Hayden 
assisted in the devotional services. Remarks by Rev. S. Coombs. 

24. Resolved, That the Committee on next session be the Commit- 
tee on the order of business at our next annual gathering, with the pastor 
of the church entertaining the Body as Chairman. 

25. Report of Committee on next session was presented and adopted. 
Annual Sermon, Rev. K. S. Hall; alternate, Rev. O. W. Kimball; Essay, 
Rev. Henry W. Tate; alternate, Rev. Edwin Bromley; Doctrinal Sermon. 
Rev. A. J. Hopkins; alternate, Rev. E. Pepper; for place of meeting, 
Pittsfield. 

20. Committee on Resolutions recommended endorsing the resolutions 
upon Temperance and Benevolence as they stand in the Minutes of lsTT. 

On Temjierance : Resolved, That we heartily bid God-speed to all xVsso- 
ciations organized for the spread of the principles of temperance, and that 
we will do what we can to aid in the good work. 

On Benevolcncet Resolved, We express anew our undiminished interest 
in the work of the American Baptist Missionary Union, the American 



45 



Baptist Home Mission Society, the New Hampshire Baptist Convention r 
and the Bible and Publication Societies of our Denomination. 

27. Besolved, That the business of the Association be compressed into 
one day. 

After Remarks by Rev. E. E. Cummings, d. d., Revs. W. S. Tucker, J. 
P. Fielden, E. Pepper, W. V. Garner, S. Coombs, A. J. Hopkins and Dea. 
A. Hamilton, it was voted to lay the resolution on the table for considera- 
tion at next session. 

28. Voted, To hear the essay, which was read by Rev. J. Coker ; Theme, 
"The energy, latent in our churches." 

29. Adjourned with prayer by Rev. J. M. Coburn. 

EVENING. 

30. Association called to order at 7.30. 

31. Sermon by the Secretary of the Missionary Union, Rev. J. N. Mur- 
dock, d. d., Boston, Mass. Text, Phil. 3: 8. Introductory services were 
conducted by Rev. W. Y. G-arner and Rev. D. Taylor, of Northwood. 
Following the sermon were addresses by Revs. J. F. Fielden and Edwin 
Bromley. 

32. Adjourned till 9 A. M. Thursday, to be preceded by an hour of 
prayer and conference. 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

33. Convened at 8 o'clock. The social service was conducted by Rev. 
J, F. Fielden. 

34. Resumed business at 9. 

35. Prayer by Bro, M, B. Critchett. 

36. The history of the Dumbarton church was read by Rev. A. J. Hop- 
kins. 

37. Resolved, That the histories of the churches presented to this Asso- 
ciation be deposited with the State Historical Society by the Clerk of the 
Association, if such arrangements can be made with the Society . 

38. The Moderator was requested to furnisll the sermon he preached 
before the Association, for publication in the Watchman. 

39. Rev. Dr. E. E. Cummings was also asked to put his historical dis- 
course in pamphlet form for circulation. 

40. The Committee of Arrangements were instructed to secure some 
one to prepare a history of one of the churches in the Association to be 
read at the next session. 

41. Revs. J. F. Fielden, E. C. Spinney and Bro. M. B. Critchett were 
appointed a Committee to provide help for churches in the Association 
desiring aid in special religious services. 

42. Resolved, That the thanks of the Association be presented to our 
Brethren and Sisters of the Pleasant Street Church for their abundant 
hospitality in entertaining the Association. 



46 



43. Voted to adjourn. 

44. Prayer by Rev. Dr. Lucian Hayden. 

W. B. SMITH, Moderator. 
E. C. Spinney, Clerk. 



' MILFORD ASSOCIATION. 
Formed 1828. 

Milford, Sept. 11, 1878. 

1. The fiftieth anniversary session of this Association was organized by 
the choice of Rev. G. W. Kinney, Moderator; S. S. Davis, Clerk; and Dea. 
Geo. Hoi brook, Treasurer. 

2. Prayer by Rev. J. C. Foster, of Randolph, Mas's. 
3 Reading Rules of Order. 

4. Visiting brethren were invited to seats with us. The following re- 
sponded; Rev. J. C. Foster, Randolph, Mass.; Rev. W. H. Eaton, Dublin 
Association; Rev. A. Heald, Newport Association ; Rev. W. A. Worthing- 
ton, Merrimack River Association. Mass.; Rev. A. P. Mason, Baptist 
Home Mission Society. 

5. The Moderator appointed Committee on Order of Business: Revs. 
R, B. Moody, J. H. Nichols and Bro. J. E. Bennett. 

6. Letter from the church in Milford was read. 

7. Partial report of the Committee on Order of Business, followed by 
the preaching of the Annual Sermon by Rev. A. S. Stowell. Text. Ro- 
mans 8:38, 39. 

S. Collection for Widows and Orphans' Fund, $7.01. 

0. The following Committees were announced by the Moderator. 

On Widows and Orphans' Fund— Rev. A. Sherwin and Bros. J.'M. Flan- 
ders and G. F. Bartlett. 

State Convention — Revs. D. Gage, J. H. Lerned, L. M. Barnes. 

Benevolence — Revs. A. S. Stowell, Wm. Libbey, Bro. J. F.Wheeler. 

Next Session— Rev. L. C. Barnes and Bros. J. A. Holt and George Hol- 
brook. 

Obituaries— Rev. W. II. Leavell, H. G. Hubbard, F. E. Cleaves. 

Temperance Rev. G. W. Nicholson and Bros. I). Putnam and J. H. 
Fisher. 

Auditing Accounts — Bros. O. Hardy and H. R. Wheeler. 

10. Committee on Order of Business submitted a report which wa9 
adopted. 

11. Letters from the churches in Londonderry and New Boston were 
read, after which the local Committee on Entertainment made an an- 
nouncement. 

12. Adjourned at 12 M.. after prayer by Rev. J. M. Coburn. 



47 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

13. Re-assembled at 1.30. Prayer and praise service led by Rev. D. 
Gage. 

14. At same hour the Woman's Foreign Mission Society held a meeting 
in Burns' Hall. 

15. Prayer by Rev. A. Heald. 

16. The reading of the letters from the churches was completed. 

17. At 3 o'clock Historical Address by Rev, A. Sherwin, which was or- 
dered entered with the records of this meeting. 

18. Collection for the purchase of a record book for the Clerk. Amount 
$4.17. 

19. Voted, That a Committee of three be appointed to consider the ex- 
pediency and expense of printing the entire records of this session. Rev. 
G. W. Nicholson, Bros. H, R. Wheeler and J. E. Bennett were appointed. 

20. Committee on order of business reported, which was adopted. 

21. After prayer, adjourned at 4.30, to meet at 7 in the evening. 

EVENING SESSION. 

22. Praise service, led by N. 0. Prescott, of Nashua. 

23. Prayer by Rev. A. Worthington, of Mass. 

24. Committee on order of business reported, which was adopted. 

25. The special order for this evening was then announced by the Mod- 
erator, viz : A re-union of past and present pastors and members of church- 
es of this Association. The services of this evening were exceedingly in- 
teresting and instructive. Rev. J. C. Foster, formerly a member of this 
Association, and present at its organization fifty years ago, spoke of the 
churches and pastors at that time. The following former pastors also ad- 
dressed the meeting: Rev. W. H, Eaton, d, d., Rev D. Gage, Rev. J. M, 
Coburn. Present pastors, Rev, G. W. Nicholson, Rev. W, H. Leavell, 
Rev. L. C, Barnes, Rev. R. B. Moody, and the Moderator, Rev. G. W. 
Kinney. • 

26. After singing. 

"Blest be the tie that binds 
Our hearts in Christian love," 
the meeting adjourned to 8.30 in the morning, 

THURSDAY MORNING SESSION, 

27. Devotional service, led by Rev. W. A, Worthington, of Mass. 

28. Prayer by Rev, A, Sherwin. 

29. List of delegates read and corrections made. 

30. Committee on State Convention reported : 

Resolved, That it is with grateful hearts that we acknowledge the great 
goodness of our Heavenly Father to us during the fifty years since the or- 
ganization of this body. 



48 



Resolved, That we, as a branch of the State Convention, will endeavor 
to do our whole duty in sustaining the preached gospel among the feeble 
churches, and in the destitute portions of our beloved State. Adopted. 

31. Report of Committee on Widows and Orphans' Fund: 
Whereas :,The number of beneficiaries are increasing and the contribu- 
tions of the last year were less than one half that of the preceding year, 
only about one-third of the benefits rendered, therefore, 

Resolved, That it is especially desirable that all the churches endeavor 
to carry out the theory of this Association, and take a contribution some- 
time in each year tor that object. Adopted. 

'32. Report of the Trustees of the Widows and Orphans' Fund : 

THE TRUSTEES OF THE WIDOWS AND ORPHANS' FUND IN ACCOUNT WITH 
THE MILFORD BAPTIST ASSOCIATION, Sept. 11, 1878. 

To deposits in Nashua Savings Bank $1235.44 

" bond of New London L. and S. Institution, 500.00 

" coupons " " " " 15.00 

" receipts of present Association : . . . 34.10 

.$1784.54 

EXPENDED, 

Nov. 12, 1877, Paid express on bond $1.00 

Feb. 22, 1878, " Mrs. C. K. Chaflin 25.00 

July 16, " " " Elvia A. Peacock, . • 25.00 

" 27, " " " C. K. Chaftii... 2500 

$76.00 

$1708.54 
Accepted. 

33. Auditors' report: 

We have this day examined the accounts of the Trustees of the Widows 
and Orphans' Fund and the Treasurer of this Association, and find them 
correctly cast and properly vouched. The report was accepted, aud Geo. 
Holbrook, John D. Chandler and D. P. Perkins were elected Trustees 
for the ensuing year. 

34. The Committee on next session reported, recommending that the 
next session be held with the Baptist Church in Greenville. Preacher of 
the Annual Sermon, Rev. W. H. Leavell; alternate, Rev. J. H, Nichols. 
Adopted. 

35. The Committee on obituaries reported as follows : 

In going through the letters of the churches, we find but a small num- 
ber of members that have been called away during the past year. There 
have been twenty- four deaths in all, the largest number in any one church 
being five. Among the prominent brethren who have passed away are 
Rev. Philip Chamberlin, who was for many years an active member of this 
body, and died in the fellowship of the Milford Church. Also, John 
Hartshorn, a deacon of the Lyndeborough Church, who was faithful in 
the vineyard of the Lord. And Jesse T. Plummer, a worthy member of 
the church in Guflstown. He died at the ripe age of eighty-five years, was 



49 



a member thirty years and was a firm supporter of the G-ospel ministry. 
We mourn the loss of those who have been taken, and are grateful that 
the Lord has not more sadly decimated our ranks. Adopted. 

36. Report of Committee on Temperance, 

Resolved, That we request the churches of this Association to strength- 
en their position on total abstinence from all intoxicating liquors, and 
that we recommend the pastors to use every laudable means to awaken an 
increased interest in the cause among the people. Adopted. 

37. Report of Committee on Benevolence. 

Whereas, The benevolent work of the church is one of vast importance, 
and its influence for good so great that it cannot be overestimated, we 
again commend to the churches of this Association a prayerful attention 
to it, especially to the work of Missions. By the recent wonderful suc- 
cess of the Teloogoo mission, God is calling more imperatively upon the 
Baptist churches of America for a deeper interest in the foreign work, 
therefore we urge upon the churches regular and hearty support of the 
monthly missionary concert, and earnest effort for increased contributions 
for this object, and at the same time greater effort than ever for 
the support of the home work. We would also recommend an annual 
collection for the work of the Education Society. Adopted. 

38. Rev. A.. P. Mason of Boston presented the claims of Home and 
Foreign Missions. 

39. Voted, That all records, documents, and papers belonging to this 
Association be placed in the hands of the Clerk. 

40. The special committee appointed last year on donations from the 
Widows and Orphans' Fund reported, which was amended by substituting 
the following resolution : 

Resolved, That the rules governing the Trustees of the Widows and Or- 
phans' Fund, passed at the session held in 1869, be rescinded. Adopted 
as amended. 

41. Collection for the purchase of books for the Clerk, $9.34. 

42. Voted, That the Clerk be paid five dollars yearly for his services. 

43. Voted, That each church be requested to prepare a brief history for 
publication with the proceedings of this semi-centennial session to be for- 
warded to the Clerk. 

44. Voted, That the special committee proceed with the publication of 
these records, provided sufficient funds shall be contributed, and that the 
Cierk be added to the committee. 

45. Voted, That the thanks of this Association be extended to Rev. A. 
Sherwin for the very able Historical Address delivered before this body, 
and that he be requested to furnish a copy for publication. 

46. The records were read by the Clerk and approved. 

47. Adjourned at 12 m. until 1 :30 p. m. 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 

48. Assembled at 1.30. The Moderator announced that the service ar- 



50 

ranged for this afternoon was a Baptist Love Feast, a free conference, 
christian experience and testimonies, prayer and praise. Nearly two hours 
were spent in this most interesting service. 

49. The following resolutions were adopted: 

Resolved, That the thanks of this Association beextended to the church 
and people of Milford for their ample and cordial hospitality. 

Also tendering to the suffering in the Southern eities and towns the 
sympathies and prayers oi' the members of this Association. 

50. After appropriate remarks by the Moderator, singing the doxology 
and prayer, adjourned to meet with the Baptist church in*Creenville the 
second Wednesday in September, 1879. 

G. W. KINNEY, Moderator. 
S. S. Davis, Clerk. 



PORTSMOUTH ASSOCIATION. 

Kokmei) 1828. 

I)0VEK,Sept. 18, 1878. 

1. The Association convened with the Baptist church at 10.30 A. M. 
Rev. Noah Hooper was chosen Moderator and Rev. C. A. Towne Clerk. 

2. Prayer by Rev. J. N. Chase, followed by singing "Rock of Ages, cleft 
for me." 

3. Visiting brethren invited to sit with us. Accepted by Rev. O. Ayer, 
No. Oxford, Mass; Rev. L. D. Hill, Waldoboro, Me.; Rev. C. II. Corey, 
Richmond, Va., and Rev. J. E. Dame, Farmington, N. II. 

4. Rules of Order read by Clerk. 

5. Committee of Arrangements made a partial report. Accepted. 
•6. Letter of welcome from church in Dover, read by pastor. 

7. Annual Sermon preached by Rev. N. Hooper. Text, Daniel G: 1,2,3. 
Subject, "Daniel an excellent model for Christians." Assisted in devo- 
tional exercises by Revs. O. P. Fuller and D. H. Stoddard. 

8. By special motion a collection was taken for the benefit of Rev. 
Amasa Brown of Newton, in place of the collection for the Widows and 
Orphans' Fund. Amount $13.30. 

9. The following committees were appointed: 

Next Session— Revs. D. II. Stoddard, E. L. Scott, J. II. Wells. 
Church History— Revs. W. H. Alden, d. p.. J. N. Chase, Dea. Samuel 
Cotton. 

Obituaries— Revs. I. J. Burgess, C. Newhall. 
Treasurer's Report— Rev. O. P. Fuller, Bro. G. D. Dodge, 

10. Adjourned with prayer by Rev. O. Ayer to meet at 2 p. if. 



51 



AFTERNOON. 

11. Met at 2 o'clock. Singing followed with prayer by Revs. C. Newhall 
and J. Clement. 

12. Committee of Arrangements made further report. Accepted. 

13. Letters from churches read in following order: Newton, Brentwood, 
North wood, Exeter, Deerfield, Portsmouth, Hampton Falls, South Hamp- 
ton, Stratham, Great Falls, Plaistow, Chester, Seabrook (statistics only,) 
and Newton Junction. After reading of Chester letter, prayer by Rev. O. 
Ayer, in special remembrance of the loss of the church in the death of 
Rev. Horace Eaton. 

14. Doctrinal sermon preached by Rev. J. N, Chase. Text, John 20, 22, 
Theme, "'The Reception of the Holy Spirit." Assisted in devotional ex- 
ercises by Rev. J. H. Wells and Rev. I. J. Burgess. 

15. Adjourned with prayer by Rev. E. L. Scott, and benediction by the 
Moderator. 

EVENING. 

16. Prayer meeting at 7 o'clock, holding 30 minutes, led by Rev. I. J. 
Burgess. 

17. Address by Rev. C. H. Corey in behalf of the Home Mission Soci- 
ety work for the Freedmen . 

18. Sermon by Rev. L. D. Hill of Waldoboro, Me. Text, James 5: 16. 
Theme, "The Efficacy of Prayer." Assisted in devotional exercises by 
Rev. C. H. Corey. 

19. Adjourned with benediction by Clerk. 

THURSDAY FORENOON. 

20. Prayer service at 9 o'clock, led by Rev. W. H. Alden, d. d. 

21. At 9.30 singing, followed with prayer by Bro. W. A. Hodgkins and 
Rev. J. N. Chase. 

22. Roll of delegates read by Clerk. 

23. Committee on Next Session, through Rev. D. H. Stoddard, made 
the following report which was adopted. Meet next year with the church 
in Great Falls; Rev. W. H. Alden, d. d. to preach the Annual Sermon, 
with Rev. O. P. Fuller as alternate ; Rev. H, O. Walker to preach the doc- 
trinal sernion, with Rev. I. J. Burgess as alternate; History of So. Hamp- 
ton church to be given by the pastor. 

24. Committee on Church History reported through Rev. W. H. Alden, 
d. d., recommending the reading of the history of the church in Dover by 
the pastor. 

25. Committee on Treasurer's Report reported through Rev. O. P. Ful- 
ler. Adopted. 

26. Voted, That we commend to the earnest interest of the churches of 
this Association, the N. H. Baptist Convention, the American Baptist Mis- 



52 



sionary Union, the Woman's Baptist Missionary Society, the American 
Baptist Publication Society, and the Northern Baptist Education Society, 
and all the members of our churches are urged to contribute of their 
prayers, and aid by their offerings of money as God has prospered them. 

27. Voted, That we heartily bid God speed to all associations organized 
for the spread of the principles of Total Abstinence from all intoxicating 
liquors, and that we will do what we can to aid in the good work. 

28. Voted, to pay the Clerk five dollars for services and expenses. 

29. Voted, To present the thanks of this Association to the Baptist 
church and society in Dover for their cordial and generous entertainment 
both at their homes and in their chapel, also to the choir, the organist 
and the chorister for their kind and faithful services. 

30. Voted, To recommend the churches in this Association to observe 
the first week in January as a week of prayer. 

31. Committee on Obituaries reported through Rev. I, J. Burgess as 
follows : 

One has been taken from the ranks of the ministry in this Association 
during the past year. Rev. Horace Eaton died at his home in Wakefield? 
Mass., June 15, 1878, at the age of 68 years. For a year previous to his 
departure he had been supplying the Baptist church in Chester. Respect- 
ing his early life and labors in the ministry we have been unable to obtain 
the information desired. We learn that lie was ordained in Bedford, and 
was subsequently pastor of the Bap\ist churches in Salem, Richmond; 
Wilton, and twice at Chester. He also served the N. H. Baptist Conven- 
tion for about three years, closing his labors in 1861. For several years 
he was obliged to withdraw from the ministry on account of ill health. 
He was a faithful minister of Christ, eminently doctrinal in style, and 
aimed to produce results, not by labored composition but by a faithful, 
earnest, and positive setting forth of Bible truth. He has completed his 
work and gone to his reward. At the last meeting of this Association in 
Newton, he feelingly set forth the self-denying efforts of the church in 
Chester to complete their house of worship and asked our sympathy and 
help. His departure suggests to us the thought that ere another anniver- 
sary of our Association occurs, some one of us present may close up his 
term of service. Let us work while we may. 

We would also mention among the prominent men of the Association 
who have died the past year, Dea. John F. Moses of Exeter. For more 
than sixty-seven years he was a true and faithful member, and for more 
than sixty-two years nobly served the church in the office of deacon. His 
influence is felt among all classes in the community in which he lived, 
and throughout, this Association where Tie was ever recognized as a pure, 
devoted man of God. 

32. Rev. D. Gage spoke in behalf of the N. II. Baptist Convention. 

33. Rev. D. II. Stoddard spoke in behalf of Foreign Missions. 

34. Rev. J. Clement spoke with reference to the church in Chester. 



53 



35. Kemarks made in memory of Rev. H. Eaton by Rev. D. Gage, and 
by Revs. J. N. Chase and N. Hooper in remembrance of Dea. Moses. 

36. Sermon preached by Rev. J. E. Dame of Farmington. Text, 1st 
Cor., 3: 11. Theme, "Christ the only Foundation." Assisted in devo- 
tional exercises by Rev. N". Hooper and Rev. D. H. Stoddard. 

37. Adjourned with prayer by Rev. C. Newhall. 

AFTERNOON. 

38. Met at 2 o'clock. Singing of "I love thy kingdom, Lord," followed 
with prayer by Rev, I. J. Burgess. 

39. A committee of three were appointed, consisting of Rev. ST Hooper, 
Rev. J. N. Chase and Rev. W. H. Alden, d. d., to disburse Widows and 
Orphans' Fund, being limited to $100 in any one case. 

40. History of Dover church, read by pastor, with a brief outline of the 
history of this Association for the past 50 years. 

41. Reminiscences tender, pleasant, joyf ill and sorrowful, were given by 
Revs. N. Hooper, D. Gage, J. X. Chase, W. H. Alden, d. d., O. P. Fuller 
C. A, Towne and Sister Cotton. 

42. Minutes read by Clerk. Adopted. 

43. Adjourned to meet with the church in Great Falls, on the third 
Wednesday in September, 1879, after singing of "Blest be the tie that 
binds," and closing remarks, prayer and benediction by the Moderator. 

Reports were presented from all the churches in the Association. Wed- 
nesday at one o'clock a meeting of the Woman's Missionary Society was 
held in the vestry of the Charles Street church. Reports from different 
churches were given, together with prayer and conference as to methods 
of working and securing increased interest among the members of the 
churches. The entire session of this fiftieth anniversary was one of sound 
gospel preaching, harmonious counsel, earnest prayer and renewed conse- 
cration. 

N. HOOPER, Moderator. 

Cha^. A. Towne, Clerk. * 



NEWPORT ASSOCIATION. 
Formed, 1828. 



New t London, Sept. 25, 1878. 

1. The Association met at the time and place designated by the Com- 
mittee on next meeting. 

2. It was called to order at 10 o'clock a. m., by the Clerk. 

3. Rev. Ira Pearsons was chosen Moderator ; Rev. G. A. Glines, Clerk, 
;and N. T. Greenwood, Treasurer. 



54 

4. Prayer was off ered by Rev. L. Hayden, D. i>., of Washington, D. C* 

5. Rules of Order were read by the Clerk. 

6. Visiting brethren were invited to a seat with us. The following, 
brethren accepted the invitation: Rev. G. F. Pay, Rev. Wallace Crocker 
of the Vermont Central Association : Rev. F. Merriam and Bro. A. Pear- 
son of the Meredith Association: Rev. H. G. Hubbard and Bro. W. G-. 
Hubbard of the Milford Association; Rev. A. P. Mason' n. n., Rev. J. N. 
Murdock, d. d., of Boston, Rev, D. Gage of Manchester, N. H., and Rev. 
L. Hayden, d. r>., Washington, D. C. 

7. Listened to the reading of the letter from the New London church. 

8. Partial report of the Committee of Arrangements. 

9. Suspended the business of Association to listen to the Annual Sermon 
by Rev. A. Heald, of Meriden church Text, Luke 24:40,— Theme. '-The 
necessity of the Baptism of the Holy Spirit." 

10. Voluntary by the choir. 

11. Collection for Widows and Orphans' Fund; amount $4.62. 

12. The following Committees were appointed. 

On Arrangements — Revs. S. C. Fletcher, H. C. Leavitt, and G. B. Smith, 
On Minutes— Rex. G. A. Glines, Seth E. Cole, Dea. J. J. Mason. 
On Next Meeting— Rev. S. C. Fletcher, S. M. Green, J. W. Peterson. 
On State of Religion— Revs. W. Hurlin, J. S. Swaim, S. H. Anderson. 
On Resolutions — Rev. P. S. Adams, E. H, Smith, G. B. Smith. 
On Auditing — E. M. Kempton, D. F. Richardson, Chas. Crockett. 
On Obituaries— Rev. N. F. Tilden, CD. Kevins, Rev. A. Heald. 

13. Voted to accept the above Committees. 

14. Voted to adjourn until 1.30 o'clock p. u. 

15. Prayer by Rev. E. P. Merrifield of Lyme church. 

A.FTEBNOOM SESSION. 

Trayer meeting for one half hour led by Rev. H. C. Leavitt of Newport 
Aurch. 

16. At 2 o'clock resumed the business of the Association. 

17. Prayer by Rev. P. S. Adams of Newport church. 

18. Listened to the reading of the letters from the Newport and Cornish 
churches. 

19. Voluntary by the choir. 

20. Suspended business to listen to the Historical Sermon of the Asso- 
ciation by Rev. S. C. Fletcher of the New London church. 

21. Voluntary by the choir. 

22. Voted to adjourn to 0.30 o'clock for prayer and conference. 
M. Prayer by Rev. II. C. Leavitt of the Newport church. 

EVENING SESSION. 

24. Prayer and conference for thirty minutes, led by Rev. D. Gage oi 

Manchester. 



55 



25. At 7 o'clock resumed tbe ousiness of the Association. 

26. Prayer by Rev. S, H. Anderson of the East Washington church. 

27. Listened to the reading of letters from former pastors in the Associ- 
ation. Rev. F. D. Blake formerly of New London church, Rev. C. A. Pid- 
dock formerly of Claremont church, E. Dodge of Hamilton, N. Y., Rev. 
E. E. Cummiugs, d. d., of Concord. IS". H. 

28. Listened to an address by Rev. L. Hayden, d. d., of Washing- 
ton, D, C. 

29. Listened to an address by Rev. A. P. Mason, n. d., in Jhe intereste 
of Home Missions. 

30. Listened to an address by Rev. D. Gage, our venerable State Mis- 
sionary, in the interests of Domestic Missions. 

31. Listened to an address by Rev. J. N. Mardock, i>. i>., in the inter- 
ests of Foreign Missions. 

32. Voted, To adjourn to meet at 8.30 o'clock Thursday a. m. 

THURSDAY MORNING. 

After a very interesting devotional service, led by Rev. Ira Pearsons of 
Newport church, resumed the business of the Association. 

33. Prayer by Rev. J. S. Swaim of the Claremont church. 

34 Listened to the reading of letters from the following churches. 
Meriden, Goshen, Canaan, East Washington, South Acworth. 

35. Listened to the report of the Treasurer, H. G. Hubbard. Ac- 
cepted. 

36. Listened to report of Committee on next meeting by Rev. S. C. 
Fletcher. 

37. Listened to a report ol Committee on the results of lay efforts dur- 
ing the past year by Bro. E. M. Kempton, of Newport church. 

38. Resolved, That one or more brethren be appointed by the several 
churches to labor within the limits of the association to develope a deeper 
religious interest during the ensuing year. 

39. Voted, That Dea. H. D. Parker of Goshen, be the chairman of such 
delegation. 

40. Listened to report on Resolutions. Adopted. 

41. Listened to report on Obituaries. Adopted. 

42. Voted, That the Clerk procure a trunk for the Association. 

43. Voted, That the Clerk report the state of religion in the Associa- 
tion to the Convention. 

44. Resolved, That we request the History of the semi-centennial of the 
Association oi its author Rev. S. C. Fletcher for publication. Referred to 
Revs. N, F. Til den and J. S. Swaim with the author. 

45. Resolved, That we regret exceedingly the sickness of Rev. E. E 
Cummings, i>. r>., of Concord, which prevents his attendance at this meet- 
ing. 

4t>. Listened to a verbal report from the church in Unity, by Rev. G. F. 
Pay, and remarks by Rev. H. C. Leavitt. 



56 



47. Voted, To commit the Unity church to the consideration of the lay 
delegation. 

48. Listened to the reading of letters from the following churches : Clare- 
mont, Lyme, West Plain field, Lebanon. 

49. Report of the Committee on the state of Religion by Rev. J. S- 
Swaim. The Committee on Religious interest report that a revival spirit 
has prevailed in three of the churches which have reported 23 of the bap- 
tisms. A good degree of religious interest prevailed in seven of the church- 
es, some of which are enjoying the stimulating influence of precious revi- 
vals. Three churches report a low state of religion. There have been 35 
baptisms in the Association, which have occurred in eight of the churches. 

50. Report of the Committee on Resolutions by P. S. Adams: 

Resolved, That the blessings vouchsafed to this body by the Great Head 
of the Church duiing the fifty years of its history, demand our devout 
gratitude and appeal to us most powerfully for increased consecration, de- 
votion, earnest zeal and persistent effort in the Master's service. 

Resolved, That the fact that the membership of this body is much less 
than at a former period of its history and the average baptisms are so few, 
should excite the serious inquiry why it is so? 

Resolved, That persevering effort should be put forth by these churches 
to reach the mass of non-church goers within their limits and by Christian 
love and tender sympathy constrain them to come to the place of public 
worship and social prayer. 

Resolved, That Colby Academy now so complete in all its appointments 
presents to us a broader basis than ever before for our confidence, and in- 
creased reason for cordial support and liberal patronage, and our earnest 
prayers that as it has been in the past so it may be in the future a marked 
power for good. 

51. Report of the Committee on Obituaries by Rev. X. F. Tilden. 

Your Committee on Obituaries would report as follows: Of the four- 
teen churches composing this Association, nine have been visited by death 
the past year. In Newport six have died; New London one; Cornish 
seven; Meriden two; Claremont three; Lyme three; Plainfield one; East 
Washington six; Hanover one; total thirty. 

In Newport died sister Lois H. Fletcher, aged 99 years. She was con- 
verted in early life and joined the church in 1793,— making a church life 
extending nearly a score of years beyond the three score and ten of human 
existence. 

Of the deceased in Cornish, we would mention Dea. A. Burnap, who 
died at the age of eighty-three years. He was a member of the church 
fifty years,— during twentj-seven of which he was clerk and during twen- 
ty more deacon, making forty-seven consecutive years of official church 
service. 

The Lyme church met with a severe loss in the death of Dea. G. Flint, 
who had been deacon and clerk of the church since its organization, a pe- 
riod of forty-seven years. 

Although not a member of any organization within the limits of the 
Association, your Committee cannot fail to notice the decease of Prof. E. 



57 

Knight, whose home was with the people of New London. In the space 
allotted ns we can only say he was an efficient and enthusiastic teacher, 
and as a mathematician he stood among the foremost in the State. He 
commenced his labors as a teacher at New Hampton, and when the school 
in that place was removed to Vermont, he came to New London, and en- 
tered upon the real work of his life — as an instructor in the'New London 
Literary and Scientific Institution, now Colby Academy. He was ordained 
as a pastor in Sutton, with which church he continued as a member until 
his death. He was more of a logical turn of mind than impulsive, — was 
firm in the faith of the denomination for whose interests, religious and in- 
tellectual, he long toiled and prayed. 

52. Nearly an hour was devoted to prayer and free conference. 

53. Resolved, That as an Association we record our grateful apprecia- 
tion of the generous hospitalities of the members of the church in New 
London, and that we sha'l remember with pleasure this commemoration 
of our Fiftieth Anniversary so fitly observed with them. 

Note, From a lady, a resident member of the church,— one word with 
regard to the choir which added so much to the interest of the meetings 
during the sitting of the Association. Among the early settlers of New 
London were some fine singers. The Fales, Burpees, Woodburys, Ever- 
etts, Messengers, Gays, Adams, Sargents and Herricks. From that time 
till the present, one hundred years, lacking a few months, representatives 
from each generation of these families have been included in the choir, and 
now in 1878, four of the fourth generation discourse sweet music to all who 
listen to them on each return of the Sabbath day. The present chorister 
has led the choir thirty-five years. 

54. The following resolution was presented by Rev. L. Hayden, d. d., 
of Washington, D. C. : 

Resolved, That we hereby express to our venerable and highly esteemed 
brother, Rev. E. E. Cummings, d. d., of the city of Concord, who assist- 
ed in the organization of this Association, our grateful appreciation of his 
long continued and successful labors in this State, our deep regrets for his 
providential absence from our semi-centennial festivities, and our fervent 
prayer that filled with divine favor, his latter end may be more blessed than 
the beginning. 

55. The Committee on Next Anniversary report, That Rev. J, S. Swaim 
of Claremont, preach the Annual Sermon, and that Rev. G. B. Smith of 
Plainfield, be his alternate ; and recommend instead of the Doctrinal Ser- 
mon, the time be left to the discretion of the Committee of Arrangements. 
That the Association meet with the Baptist church in Newport on the 4th 
Wednesday in September, 1879. 

56. After singing the 116th Hymn in Psalmist, and interesting and deep- 
ly impressive remarks and prayer by our venerable father in Israel, Rev. 
Ira Pearsons, of Newport, the Association closed its Fiftieth Anniversary, 

IRA PEARSONS, Moderator. 

G. A. GLINES, Clerk. 

Note. On the day preceding the meeting of the Association, a Sunday 



58 



School Convention was organized, which is to meet annually in connection 
with the Association. E. L. Wheeler) of Scytheville, is Secretary. 



WHITE MOUNTAIN ASSOCIATION. 
Formed 1842. 

Sthatford, June 12, ls78. 
The Association came to order. 

1. Chose Rev. Silas Dean, Moderator. 

2. Chose Chester Thomas, Clerk. 

3. Committee of Arrangements, Kev. D, Gage and Brethren S. W. Cur- 
tis and E. A Baldwin. 

4. Prayer by Rev. W. V. Garner. 

5. Invited visiting brethren to sit with us; the following brethren re- 
sponded: Rev. David Gage, State Convention; Rev, W. V. Garner, Salis- 
bury Association: Rev. J. D. Tilton, Meredith Association; Rev. A, Sher- 
wiu, Milford Association; D. Taylor, d. d., Portsmouth Association: 
Rev. N. W. Alger, Danville, Vt. Association ; Rev. F. W. Rankin, Mere- 
dith Association. 

0. Reading of the rules of order. 

7. Committee of Arrangements reported in part. 

8. Reading of letter from Stratford. 

9. Listened to the Annual Sermon by D. Taylor, D. j>.. from Eph. 4: 4, 6. 

10. Prayer by Rev. J. D. Tilton. 

11. Adjourned to meet at 2 o'clock p. m. 

AFTERNOON. 

12 Came to order. Prayer by Rev. D. Gage. 

13. Heard the letters from Lancaster and Lunenburg. 

14. Listened to sermon by Rev, A. Sherwin from 1st Peter 2: 24. 

15. Congregation sung "Coronation." 

16. Report of Committee on Topics, First, the duty of the churches 
to supply themselves and others with the ministry of the Word. .Second, 
the relation of the churches to t'.ie Temperance reform. The first was re- 
sponded to by Revs.W. Y. Garner, 1). Gage, ST. W. Alger, A. Sherwin and 
.J. I). Tilton. 

IT. Prayer by Rev. F. \V. A. Rankin. 

18. Adjourned to meet at 8 o'clock p. m. 

19. Evening session. Prayer by Bro. Rankin. 

20. Sermon by Brother Garner. % 



59 



21. Prayer by Bro. Taylor. 

22. Adjourned to 9 o'clock a. m. 



SECOND DAY. 

23. Came to order. Prayer by Rev. R. Barry. 

24. Listened to reading of letters from Jefferson and Carroll. 

25. Committee on Next Session report that tlie next session be held at 
Lunenburg, Vt., on the second Wednesday in June, 1879, and that we 
depend on visiting brethren for the Annual Sermon. 

26. Listened to sermon by Rev. F. W. A, Rankin, from John 20 : 8. 

27. Chose a Committee on Obituaries— Rev. N. W. Alger, Rev. D. 
Gage and Chester Thomas. 

28. Prayer by Rev, N. W. Alger. 

29. Adjourned till 2 o'clock p. m. 

AFTEIINOON SESSION. 

30. Came to order. Prayer by Bro. W. H. H. Collins of the Methodist 
church. 

31. Rev. N. W. Alger from Committee on Obituaries presented the fol- 
lowing : 

Rev. E. Evans was born at Gloucester, Cape Ann, 1778. He joined the 
United States navy and served four years in the war of 1812. He lost his 
right arm in an engagement June 4, 1815. Although it was some years 
after this before he was converted, yet this was the means used to bring 
him to Christ, as the ball that took his arm killed the man on the other 
side of him. He made a profession of religion, was baptized in 1826, was 
licensed to preach the gospel by the church in Jefferson, N. H., in 1846, 
and for four years he preached in Randolph, Jefferson, Carroll, and this 
place. He was ordained at Lunenburg, Vt., Sept. 11, 1850, where he re- 
mained nine years very generally respected and beloved. His last attempt 
to preach was at Gorham Hill in the summer of 1873,, but he was not able 
to finish his sermon. He passed to his reward Dec. 24, 1877. 

Chester Thomas called attention to the labors of Rev. Philip Chamber- 
lain in this vicinity, particularly in Jefferson, N. H., and Lunenburg Vt., 
who passed away in February last at Milford, N. H. Rev. D. Gage and 
Rev. J. D. Tilton gave us a very interesting account of their acquaintance 
with Brother Chamberlain in his genial and ripe old age. 

32. Besoloed, That the work of the N. H. Baptist State Convention pre- 
sents claims for the benevolent consideration of our churches of the first 
importance, that an earnest effort be made by each church to raise the full 
amount of their assessment. 

33. Resolved, That it is the duty of the churches of this Association to 
put forth very strenuous exertions to provide the permanent ministry of 
the Word for themselves and the co nmunities where they ar > located. 



60 

34. Resolved, That while it is the proper labor of the churches to be 
careful to maintain good works as well as to avoid evil, there is a special 
demand for labor to promote righteousness and Temperance in all our 
borders. 

35. Voted, To instruct the Clerk to give an account of the state of re- 
ligion in the churches to the Convention. 

36. A vote of thanks to the people of Stratford for their kindness and 
hospitality and for the assistance of the choir. 

37. Voted, To adjourn to 7 1-2 o'clock . 

38. Prayer by Brother Tilton. 

EVENING SKSSION. 

39. Prayer by Brother Gage. 

40. Sermon by Rev. J. D. Tilton. Luke 23: 39—48. 

41. Voted, To adjourn to meet with the Baptist church in Lunenburg, 
Vt., on the second Wednesday in June, 1879. 

42. Prayer by Rev. Silas F. Dean. 

SILAS F. DEAN, Moderator. 
Chesteb Thomas, Clerk. 



N. II. BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL CONVENTION. 



Exeteb, Oct. 15, KsTo. 

1. At 10 1-4 o'clock a. m., the Secretary, Rev. Win. Hurlin, called the 
Convention to order. Rev. W. V. Garner was chosen President pro tern. 
After singing. Rev. E. C. Spinney and Brethren A. J. Kidder and F. S. 
Crawford wore appointed a Committee on Nominations, and prayer was 
offered by Revs. W. II. Stewart and A. J. Hopkins. 

2. The Secretary read the Constitution of the Convention, and also the 
Minutes of the Convention of last year, and the Financial Account whirl 
showed that the expenses of tbe year were twenty-nine cents, and that 
the amount deposited in two Savings banks is 825.55. and the cash balance 
on hand, seventy-eight cents. Accepted. 

3. The Committee on Nominations reported, and the following officers 
were chosen : 

President— Rev, W. V. Garner. Concord. 

Vice President— Bro. N. T. Greenwood, New London. v 

Secretary and Treasurer— Rev, Wm. Hurlin, Antrim. 

4. Rev. J. X. Chase reported for the Committee of Arrangements and 
the report was adopted. 

5. Rev, W. V. Gamer opened the questions, "What is success in Sun- 



61 

clay School work ?" and "By what methods is it gained?" Rev. W. H. 
Leavell read an essay on "The agency of the Sunday School in the forma- 
tion of character." Remarks were then offered by Revs. T. C. Gleason, 
D, H, Stoddard, Wm. Hurlin, E. C. Spinney, J. E. Dame, J. D. Tilton, F. 
Merriam, A. J. Hopkins, J. N. Chase, S. C. Fletcher and Brother A. J. 
Kidder. 

6. The pastor of the church with which the Convention may meet, with 
Rev. J. F. Fielden and Dea. G. Holbrook, were appointed a Committee of 
Arrangements for next year. 

7. Rev. J. 1ST. Chase, on behalf of the church in Exeter, gave a cordial 
welcome to the members of the Convention. 

8. After singing, followed by prayer by Rev. J. L. Sanborn, adjourned 
til) 7 o'clock p. m. 

EVENING. 

9. Service of Song, conducted by Supt. H. C. Moses. 

10. Prayer by Rev. D. Taylor, followed by singing. 

11. Address by Supt. T. B. Garland on "Reading as connected with Sun- 
day Schools." 

12. Singing, followed by an address by Rev. G. W. Gile of Lawrence, 
Mass., on "How to secure the attendance of Sunday School scholars at 
Public Worship." 

13. Remarks by Revs. F. Merriam, S. S. White, D. Taylor, N. J. Clark, 
W. V. Garner and W, H. Leavell. 

14. Prayer by Rev. G. W. Gardner, d. d. Adjourned. 

W. V. GARNER, President. 
- Wm. Hurlin, Secretary. 



62 

NEW HAMPSHIRE BAPTIST PASTORAL ASSOCIATION. 

1. The Association met in Exeter in the Baptist church Oct. 15, at 2 
o'clock P. M. 

2. After singing, prayer was offered by Rev. J. D. Tilton. 

.'>. The report of the Secretary and Treasurer was read and adopted. 

4. The following resolution was presented by Rev. E. E. Cumraings, d. d. 
Resolved. That we so far reorganize this Association as to accept the 
charter prepared by our Legislature, last July, incorporating the "Confer- 
ence of Baptist ministers in New Hampshire," and we hereby assume the 
name and act under the provisions of said charter. Laid on the table. 

5. The statistical report was read and adopted. 

6. Voted, That the officers of the last year continue to serve during the 
present session. 

7. The Committee of Arrangements made their report which was 
adopted. 

s. The Committee on Obituaries reported through Rev. W. H. Eaton, 
d. D., as follows: 

Your committee on obituaries would state, as a cause of special grati- 
tude to our Heavenly Father, that during the last year no pastor within 
the limits of our State Association has been removed by death. Still, 
dearly beloved ministers, who, heretofore, have served churches in this 
State, have been called to their reward. These wtre of ripe age, having 
served their generation by the will of God. Their works not only follow 
them, but remain after them, as a testimony of that divine grace which 
perfects in the heart of the believer what it first plants there. 

The following outline (slightly modified) is from the necrologist of Brown 
University : 

Rev. James Barnaby died in Harwich, Mass., December 10, 1877, at the 
age of 90 years, 5 months and 15 days. He was born in Freetown, Mass., 
June 25, 1787, and was the son of Ambrose and Philena (Burt) Barnaby. 
He prepared for college at Bristol Academy in Taunton, of which the Rev. 
Simeon Daggett was then the Principal, and after graduating at Brown 
University in the class of 1807, he was for a year the teacher of a school 
in Taunton. It had been his intention to study law, but while here he 
abandoned his purpose and began to prepare for the Christian ministry. 
During his college residence he had been baptized and admitted as a mem- 
ber of the First Baptist church in Providence. After a brief period of 
such theological study as was then within his reach, he was ordained in 
July, 1811, and immediately became the pastor of the Baptist church 
in Harwich, Mass. Of this church he remained in charge till 1819, 
when he became the minister of the Baptist church in New Bed- 
ford. He removed to Amesbury in 182;), and was subsequently min- 
ister, for periods of various lengths, of the churches in Deerfield, N. 
H., in Salisbury and Amesbury, Mass., in Danversport, in Lowell, in 
Townseud, a second time in Harwich, and in Nantucket, where he spent 
three years, from 1846 to 1849. During the following three years he was 
in the service of the Baptist Sunday School Union. In 1852 he again be- 
came pastor ot the church in Harwich, where he remained seven years. 
He afterwards had charge of other churches for brief periods and was 
with the church in Campion, N. H., during the year 1861, but in 1862 he 
returned to Harwich and became for the fourth time the pastor of the 
church there, and continued in its service to the end of his life, a period of 
fifteen years. His entire ministry covered a period of nearly sixty-seven 
years, of which not less than thirty-nine were spent with the church with 



which it began and ended. He baptized 2800 persons. So vigorous was 
his constitution, that in all the numerous settlements of his long and va- 
ried ministry, he was very seldom detained, even in his old age, from the 
pulpit services He used to say that he ''had not lost a meal of victuals, or 
failed to preach the gospel on a Sunday for more than forty years." His 
death was without disease or premonition of any kind. He married Aug, 
10, 1810, Abigail Burt of Berkeley, who survives him with five children 
three sons and two daughters. 

Rev. Philip Chamberlain died in Milford, Feb. 19, 1878, aged 82 years 
and 10 months. He was born in Turner, Maine, April 25, 1795. He was 
converted when about thirty years of age. His attention was soon called 
to the ministry, and with this in view he spent a short season in Water- 
ville College, now Colby University. He was licensed to preach by the 
Baptist church in Hebron, Me., Aug. 30, 1830, and was ordained by that 
church as an evangelist Jan. 11, 1831. The first part of his ministry was 
spent in Maine, with the churches in Sangerville and Kennebunk. He also 
was pastor of the church in Lunenburg, Vt. But a large part of his pas- 
toral work was in connection with churches in this Sta'e; in Jeffersoi^ in 
Campton, in Hillsborough, and in Bradford. After retiring from the active 
duties of the ministry, he lived in Franklin, Londonderry and Milford. 
Having entered the ministry late in life, with very limited advantages for 
intellectual improvement, he sought those fields demanding hard and ear- 
nest labor, which could render a meagre salary in return. He understood 
economy, and so lived honestly before the world. His preaching was not 
with enticing words of man's wisdom, but as an ambassador of the Lord 
Jesus he commended the Word, as he understood it, to every man's con- 
science as in the sight of God. 

By his genial and social nature, with a ready fund of anecdotes, with a 
strong desire to win souls, he made his pastoral visits entertaining and 
useful. In the last and quiet years of his life he was not the source of an- 
noyance and hindrance to his pastor, but his real co- laborer, his true and 
sympathizing friend. He matured for heaven like as the fruits of the 
•earth ripen for the garner, and came down to the grave in full age, with 
an unfailing hope of an eternal weight of glory. His wife survived him 
only a few days. They had been lovely and pleasant in their lives and in 
death they were not long divided. 

Rev. Horace Eaton was born in Goffstown Oct. 5, 1811, and died in 
Wakefield, Mass., June 15, 1878, aged m years, 8 months and 10 days. He 
was baptized into the fellowship of the Baptist church in Goffstown on the 
second Sabbath in September, 1833. He had a severe struggle in his own 
mind in regard to his call to the ministry. For a long time he could think 
.of nothing else, and yet could not entertain this thought on account of 
his apparent unfitness. Still the call was so distinct, "now therefore go 
and I will be thy mouth, and teach thee what thou shaltsay," and the woe 
so impressive if he refused to preach the gosnel, that he dared not de- 
cline. With this work in view the church in Goffstown voted to "encour- 
age him in his studies " Dec. 11, 1831. He graduated at New Hampton The- 
ological Institution in 1841. While a student there in 1839, he supplied the 
church in Dunbarton— then worshipping in the east part of the town— for 
some three months. In connection with his labors there several persons 
were converted, which he always regarded as a providential indication that 
he was in the path of duty. He was ordained the pastor of the Baptist 
ehurcn in Bradford Oct. 26, 1812, where he spent some three years, ,and 
then labored one year in the West under appointment of the Home Mis- 
sionary Society. Subsequently lie preached in Chester, in Milton, and in 
Dunbarton, about four years in each place. He served as Agent of the 
Convention from July 1, 1859, to > April 15 1862. He then preached in 



64 

North Reading, Mass., about a year after which, for private considerations, 
he gave up stated pastoral work, and moved to Wakefield, Mass., where he 
spent the last fifteen years of his life, occasionally supplying vacant pulpits 
as Providence opened the way. When the church in Salem was unable to 
sustain a pastor, though aided by the Convention, he was their stated sup- 
ply from June, 1871, to April, 1873, during which time they increased in 
strength. About a year he preached in Richmond, closing in June, 1870. 
Under God he called this old church to life, it having been for years "with- 
out fruits." In 1877 he supplied the church in Chester, which had lost its 
house of worship by fire. Under his labors the church was building anew 
house, which he greatly desired to see finished, and that without debt. 
But God called him from his labors before this work was done. On Sat- 
urday morning, Feb. 23, he was stricken down with apoplexy, from which 
lie had but partially recovered when a second attack, in less than four 
months, closed the gate of this life, and opened to his enrapturing vision 
the mansions of glory. 

Horace Eaton wab a good minister of Jesus Christ. He was true and 
faithful in all the relations of life. He suffered greatly from natural dif- 
fidence, especially in public speaking. But he was independent as most 
men in tin* formation of his opinions. He was remarkably conscientious, 
which was a strong impulsive power in all his work. He had a logical 
turn of mind, and leaned strongly to Calvinistic views of the great doc- 
trines of grace. He was clear and often very impressive in unfolding 
these doctrines. The Saviour, in his all-sufficient power to redeem the 
lost, was the joy and crown of his rejoicing. He left a sweet and inspiring 
influence on all the churches with which he labored. He was twice mar- 
ried; first to Sarah Chandler, of Nashua, by whom he had three children, 
two of whom are now living; second, to Mrs. Ann Elizabeth Wiley, of 
Wakefield, Mass., who survives him with one child. 

Rev. Phineas Bond died in Jay, Me., July 8, 1878. He was born in 
Watertown, Mass., Aug. 20, 1797. He was converted under the ministry 
of Dr. Sharp, and was baptized by him into the fellowship of the Charles 
Street Baptist Church, Aug. 15, 1810. He was deeply convinced that 
God called him to preach the gospel, and his pastor and the church were 
of the same opinion. He closed up his business affairs and commenced 
studying, and at the same time he commenced preaching. So whether he 
was pursuing his studies under Rev. Charles Train, of Framingham, or in 
connection with Waterville College, he was preaching as he had opportu- 
nity in the neighboring towns. He was greatly blessed in preaching, and 
soon enjoyed quite a reputation as a revivalist. He remained in Water- 
ville less than a year, and after preaching in East AVinthrop and Cherry- 
field several months each, he was ordained in the latter place May 25. 
1825. Here in the Spring of 1827, he was the grand agent in the forma- 
tion of a Temperance Society, which, it is claimed was the first organiza- 
tion on the principle of total abstinence in Maine. He labored successive- 
ly as pastor in Eastport, Warren, Fayette and Brewster, Mass. Then he 
was settled in Rumney, this State, from July 25. 1847 to March 5, 1849; 
and he was pastor in Cornish for some two years, from 1856 to 1S58. He 
afterward returned to Maine where he continued in the active duties of 
theministry till 1808. The last ten years of his life was spent in Jay. 
where was his last work in the pastorate. His ministerial life was a sort 
of pioneer work. In a letter written in 187(5, he says : "I have preached 
one or more times in over one hundred different towns, and in all over 
nine thousand sermons. I have preached in meeting-houses, court-houses, 
academies, school-houses, barns, state-prisons, dwelling-houses, log cabins, 
and out ot doors. I have travelled sixty miles on horse-back to baptize, 
and from one to twenty often, to attend funerals. And now in my old 
age, I rejoice in the high stand the Baptists take in missions, in Sunday 



65 



schools, in education ami in the various benevolent operations of the day. 
I believe in a thoroughly educated ministry. My prayer is God bless and 
prosper the Baptists more and more in their plain and scriptural presenta- 
tion of truth." Dr. Shailer says of Bro. Bond: "Christ was most emphat- 
ically the theme of his preaching, and Christ owned and blessed his 
labors. Though not a great or faultless preacher, he was in the leading- 
elements of his character a thoroughly good man, honest, faithful, true, 
sound in belief and practice ; and we say this after a personal acquaintance 
of forty years." 

Three of the four names constituting the subjects of these obituary no- 
tices were over eighty years of age at their death. One by reason of 
strength had attained to fourscore years and ten. Yet the silver cord was 
loosed, and the golden bowl was broken, Then the dust returned 
to the earth as it was, and the spirit to God who gave it. Brethren, we 
may say as Paul said, "Though ye have ten thousand instructors in Christ, 
yet have ye not many fa! hers." Let us rise up before the hoary heads, 
and honor the faces of the old men, who still linger to cast the hallowed 
influence of their declining life, especially upon those whose sun has al- 
ready passed its zenith and is hastening on in its path beyond the visible 
horizon. "Brethren, be ye steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the 
work of the Lord; forasmuch as ye know that your labor is not in vain in 
the Lord." 

Adopted. 

Alter singing by the choir and c< ngrfgation, and piayer by Rev. W. V 
Garner, the Annual Sermon was preached by Rev. C. A. Towne of Dover. 
Text, 2 Kings 2: 19, 22. Theme, "The Proclamation of the Gospel the 
Salt that purifies and Saves. 

10. A collection amounting to .$10,00 was then taken. 

11. The Pastoral Association then a djonrned subject to the call of the 
Chairman. 

12. After a short recess the Association was again called to order. 

13. The following resolution was offered by Rev. E. E. Cummings, i>. i>. 

Resolved, That all records, papers and money now in the bands of the 
Secretary and Treasurer of this Association be delivered to the Secretary 
and Treasurer of the Conference of Baptist Ministers in New Hampshire, 
respectively, and that all legacies and bequests made to the New Hamp- 
shire Baptist Pastoral Association shall be legally claimed by the Confer- 
ence of Baptist Ministers in New Hampshire, and that this Association 
adjourn without day. 

Adopted and the Association adjourned sine die. 

J. N. CHASE, President. 
A. J. HOPKINS, Secretary, 



CONFERENCE OF BAPTIST MINISTERS IN N. H. 



Rev. E. E. Cummings, d. D. } having stated before the Pastoral Associa- 
tion his views and feelings with regard to aged and indigent Baptist Min- 
isters, and submitted a plan for their relief, the Association adjourned to 
the call of the President, that the persons named in a charter for carrying 
out the plan of Dr. Cummings, might be called together for action; the 
persons named in the Charter were called to order by Dr. Cummings, and 
Rev. W. V. Garner was chosen Chairman, and Rev. W. H. Eaton, r>. r>., 
Clerk. 

The Charter was read and adopted. 

The Constitution, as proposed by Rev. Dr. Cummings. which was a mod- 
ification of the Constitution of the Pastoral Association, was also adopt- 
ed. A list of officers under the new Constitution was presented by Bro. 
Sherwin, pending the election of which the Conference, after prayer, ad- 
journed to meet in the small vestry to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock. 

wednp:stjay morning. 

The Conference met this morning as adjourned. Prayer by Rev. W. H. 
Alden, d. d. It was voted that the officers be chosen by hand vote. The 
list was again read, and the officers were elected as nominated : 

For President, Rev. E. E. Cummings, d. d. ; for Secretary, Rev. E. C. 
Spinney; for Treas, Rev. N. Hooper; for Directors, Revs. J. D. Tilton, 
W. H. Eaton, d. d., W. V. Garner, G. W. Nicholson, W. H. Alden. d. d., 
S. C. Fletcher and S. A. Read; for Auditors, C. H. Martin, and D, A. 
Brown . 

W. H. EATON, Clerk. 

A Committee of Arrangements for next year was appointed, viz: Revs. 
W. B. Smith, J, S. Swaim and J. F. Fielden. The Commiitee of Arrange- 
ments reported as follows; for place, same as Convention; time, Tuesday 
before the Convention at 2 o'clock p. m. 

Preacher, Rev. W. H. Eaton, u. n. ; alternate, Rev. W. H. Leavell; Es- 
sayist, Rev. E. C. Spinney; alternate, Rev. R. B. Moody. Report adopt- 
ed. At the suggestion of Rev. Dr. Cummings, a Committee of conference, 
with the proper officers of the Sunday School Convention, was appointed 
viz: Revs. E. C. Spinney, J. F. Fielden and R. B.Moody. Rev. Win. 
Ilurlin was appointed Statistical Reporter. A Committee on Obituaries 
was chosen, consisting of Revs. J. D. Tilton, W. H. Alden, d. d., and W. 
H. Leavell. Adjourned to the call of the President. Prayer by Rev. D. 

Gage. 

E. C. SPINNEY, Secretary, 



67 
ACT OF INCORPORATION. 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

In the Year of our lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and 
Seventy-Eight : 

AN ACT to incorporate "The Conference of Baptist Ministers in New 
Hampshire." 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, in General 
Court convened : 

Section 1. Ebenezer E. Cummings, Wm. H. Eaton, George W. Nich- 
olson, Wm. H. Alden, Alden Sherwin, Wm. V. Garner, KingS. Hall, Wm. 
Hurlin, Franklin Merriam, Wm. B. Smith, Jeremiah D. Tilton, Edmund 
C. Spinney, Harry O. Walker and Stephen C. Fletcher, their associates 
and successors, are hereby made a Corporation by the name of "The Con- 
ference of Baptist Ministers in New Hampshire" for the purpose of re- 
lieving aged and disabled Baptist Ministers who are indigent; with all the 
powers and privileges, and subject to all the duties, liabilities and restric- 
tions of similar Corporations under the laws of this State. 

Section 2. Said Corporation may for the purposes aforesaid hold real 
and personal estate to an amount not exceeding seventy- five thousand dol- 
lars. 

Section 3. This Act shall be in force from and after its passage. 
Approved July 2, 1878. 



CONSTITUTION. 

Art. 1. The name of this Society shall be "The Conference of Baptist 
Ministers in New Hampshire." 

Art, 2. Every ordained Baptist Minister resident in New Hampshire, 
who is a member in good and regular standing of a Baptist Church in the 
State, shall be a member of the Conference. 

Art. 3. The chief objects of the Conference shall be to promote mu- 
tual improvement and the increased usefulness of its members and the re- 
lief of indigent and disabled Baptist Ministers in New Hampshire. 

Art. 4. The Annual Meeting of the Conference shall be held on the 
Tuesday preceding the third Wednesday in October. The exercises shall 
consist of a sermon by some member of the Conference previously ap- 
pointed, to be followed by a free conference, and such other services as 
may from time to time be deemed proper. After the sermon a collection 
shall be taken in aid of the object of the Conference. 

Art. 5. The Conference shall annually elect by ballot, unless otherwise 
ordered, a President, Secretary, Treasurer, and one Director from each 
Association in the State, who together shall constitute a Board of Direc - 
ors for the management. The Conference shall also choose as above, an 
Auditing Committee of two. 

Art. 6. The President shall preside at all the meetings of the Confer- 
ence and Board df Directors, and have the general oversight of the affairs 
•of the Conference. 

The secretary shall keep a full record of the doings of the Conference 



68 

and Board of Directors. He shall also keep a record of the settled pas- 
tors in the State, including their names, -residences, and the date of their 
dismission. 

The treasurer shall have charge of the funds of the Conference and dis- 
burse them only by order of the Board of Directors. The Board of Di- 
rectors shall supervise the investment of funds, and decide an appropria- 
tions, and have the general management of the affairs of the Conference. 

The Auditing Committee shall examine the treasurer's account and ev- 
idences of property and report to the Board of Directors at each Annual 
Meeting. 

Art. 7. All gifts and legacies made to the Conference, and all moneys 
coming into the treasury in any way shall he safely invested, and if at any- 
time the income of the Permanent Fund is not needed for the purposes 
of the Conference as specified in the Article of Incorporation, the surplus 
shall be added to the Permanent Fund. But in no case shall a draft be 
made on the Permanent Fund to meet appropriations or for any other 
purpose. The interest that accrues shall only be used. 

Art. 8. This Constitution may be altered at any Annual Meeting by a 
vote of two-thirds of the members present. 



Take heed to thyselj that thou forsake not the Levite, as long as thou 
livest upon //A> earth. — Deut. 12:10. 

TO THE BAPTIST CHURCHES IN NEW H AMI'S HIRE. 

Beloved Brethren: — You will learn by the foregoing proceedings, that 
an organization has grown out of the "New Hampshire Baptist Pastoral 
Association, which is empowered to hold funds for the relief of aged, in- 
firm, and indigent Baptist ministers in the State. This charity has hith- 
erto been sadly neglected. In most of our Associations, provision is made 
for the Widows and Orphans of deceased Baptist Ministers, but nothing 
for the minister and his family, while he is living. Is this just'? Should 
not the man who has spent the vigor of his manhood, for the good of oth- 
ers be provided for, when his "strength failetb." Most of our ministers 
lay up nothing. If, during their active ministry, they receive a comfort- 
able support, it is considered that they are well dealt by, and hence when 
they cease to labor there is nothing left to support them. Here is a want 
that should be met, and the conference of Baptist Ministers in New 
Hampshire proposes to meet it by creating a fund, the annual income of 
which shall be applied to aid aged infirm ministers in our State. We pro- 
pose three ways to raise money for this fund : First, — by personal gifts. 
Second, — by public contribution. Third, — by legacies. Money may be 
forwarded to Rev. N. Hooper, Exeter, N. H. 

In behalf of the Directors, 

E. E. CUMMINGS, President. 



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DISPOSITION OF MONEYS. 

\s SHOWN UV TREASURERS OF ASSOCIATIONS AND TRUSTEES OH 1 
WIDOWS AND ORPHANS' FUXDS. 



TREASURERS 

AM) 

Associations. 


.$47X)0 


3! 

§3 


H j Convention. 


^ <6 

U 

1-= 


0) 

o 
c 

$■ 

% 

a 

3 


Minutes. 


Widows and 
Orphans F'ds 
on Deposit. 


o 
H 


Meredith, A. V. Tilt on. 
Dublin,.!. Hammond,* 


$6.53 


$1.00 


$32.75 


$66.00 .$176.28 


Salisbury. J. S. Brown, 
Milford.G- Holbrook. 
Portsmouth. C. A.Towne. 
Newport.N.T.Greenwood, 
White M'nt'n, C. Thomas* 


10.00 

5.00 

23.50 

30.43 


19.66 

41.57 

2.50 

KJ.14 


135.55 

11 4. GO 

122.00 

70.65 


8.50 

3.00 

1 .00 


2.66 

18.30 
2.00 


57.05 
55.25 
41.50 
35.05 


833.54 1063.64 
1708. 54 1 1930.02 
1044.741 1252.54 

111.67J 266.94 


















Total. 


115.93 


$85.74 


$465.86 


$12.50 


$23.30 


$221.60 


$3764.49|$4689.42 



*No report. 



STATISTICAL REPORT 

OF THE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE BAPTIST PASTORAL ASSOCIATION. 



IBY REV, "WIM. UTTZR/ULT.:!*-. 
REMOVALS INTO THE STATE. 



Swaim from Cambridge, Mass 



I. S 

E. Bromley 

W. Read 

L. C. Stevens.. . 

F. E. Cleaves. . 
I . W. Coombs . . 
I. W. Merrill... 
E. M. Shaw.... 
E. P. Merrifield 

D.Taylor, 

L. C. Barnes. . . 



Norwood, Mass. 

Littleton, Mass 

E. Brookfield, Mass. 



to Claremont. 
" Pittsfield. 
" Fitz william. 
" Great Falls. 
" New Boston. 
" Rumney. 
" Potters ville. 
'• Antrim. 



.... '• Conn 

— " Rockland, Maine 

... " Vershire, Vt " Lyme. 

... " Brooklyn, N. l " E. Northwood. 

... " Kalamazoo, Mich " Greenville. 

REMOVALS WITHIN THE STATE. 
1). Graham from Greenville to So. Ae worth. 



G. Hubbard. 

. Hurlin 

Newhall... 
A. Piddock 
L. Scott .... 
S. White.... 



. .. " Meriden 

.. " Mill Village 

.. " Pottersville 

•' Claremont 

Brent wood 

.. " Lyme 

REMOVALS OUT OF THE STATE. 



So. Lyndeboro'. 
Antrim. 
Brentwood. 
Hinsdale, 
So. Hampton. 
So Hamilton. 



L. Sanborn iron 

P. Pay - 

. R. Warner " 

B. Burr " 

W. Dalton " 

ll. Lane " 

F. Morion " 

W. Frink - 

H. Fish " 

I,;. (ham •• 



Stratford to Waterboro', Mc 

Goshen " Vershire, Vt. 

Lyndeboro' " Ira, Vt. 

Fisherville " W.Medway.Mass. 

Sanbornton " Byfleld, Mass. 

Newton " No. Uxbridge, Ms. 

New London " Newton. 

Hinsdale '• Moosup, Conn. 

Antrim '• Brewster, Mass. 

Fit/.williani " 

RESIGNATIONS. 
.). 15. Breed, Rumney. J. M. Coburn. Pittsneld. 

T. I'.. Eastman, No. Sutton, ll . c. Lea> ett, Newport. 

W. P>. smith, Fisherville. T. M.Merriman, Meredith Village. 

DEATH. 

Chamberlain Milford Feb. 19, L878, aged 82. 

ORDINATIONS. 

n. Wells Newton Jan. 9, 1878. 

W. Kimball Bow " 30, " 

\. Read No. Stratford Oct. 9, " 



ASSOCIATIONS. 



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78 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



K. .T. PKBBCOTT, IN ACCOUNT WITH N. ir. BAPTIST CONVENTION. 

Dr. 

For Collections, per tables, from the churches, $2,581.19 

Collections in Convention 13.69 

Interest received on funds, 408.G4 

Pulpit supplies, 79.39 

Miss Mary P. Clark, Life Member, 20 00 

Printing Minutes, 261.93 

Legacy Estate, Betsey Tucker, (Sutton,) 100.00 

Legacy Estate, Mary P. Dodge, New Boston, 1,371.13 



$4,835.97 



Ck. 

Paid Cash borrowed 1877— and interest, $13028 

Rev. K. S. Hall, secretary and expenses, 137.44 

Jos. B.Clark, Esq., Fees 20.00 

Rev. I). Gage, Agent and Postage, 807.85 

Hinsdale church, 125 00 

New Ipswich " 125.00 

Amherst " 50.00 

So. Hampton '■ 75.00 

Salem " 125.00 

Danbury " 50.00 

Hampt'n Falls" 75.00 

Conway " 150.00 

Stratford " 50.00 

Peterboro' " 125.00 

Wilton " 100.00 

Richmond " 100 00 

Chester " 100.00 

Troy " 100.00 

East Weare " 100 00 

Goshen " 100.00 

Lyndeboro' " 84.61 

Lyme " 50.00 

Meredith " 50.00 

No.Sanbornt'n" 75.00 

Suncook " 150.00 

Canaan " 67.30 

Woodstock " 100.00 

No. Stratford " 26 92 

Fitzwilliam " 100.00 

So. Acworth " 64.90 

Pittsfield " 76.92 

Printing and Postage, secretary and Pru. Committee,. . . 21.75 

Expenses and Postage of Treas 35.00 

Printing bill, H.R. Wheeler 238.00 

Amount invested 1000,00 

Cash balance 50.00 

$4,835.97 

This certifies that we have examined the above accounts, and find them cor- 
rectly cast and accompanied with proper vouchers. We find the present value 
of invested funds to be seventy-six hundred dollars. 

STILLMAN HUMPHREY, I A „,, U/vro 
FRED'K S. CRAWFORD, I AU<mors 



Concord, Nov. 30, 1878. 



79 



COMPENDIUM OF THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE PASTORAL 
ASSOCIATION. 

From its Organization to 1878. 



Year Where Met. Pres. and Sec'y. 



1832 

1833 

1834 

1835 

1835 

1835 

1836 

1837 

1838 

1839 

1840 

1843 

1846 

1847 

1848 

1848 

1849 

1850 

1851 

1852 

1853- 

1854 

1855 

1856 

1857 



Portsmouth, 

Rumney, 

Jaffrey, 

Deerfield, 

Deerfield, 

Henniker, 

Pittsfield, 

New Boston, 

New London, 

Deerfield, 

Sanbornton, 

Hillsborough, 

Rumney, 

Brentwood, 

Milford, 

Manchester, 

Claremont, 

New London, 

Dover, 

Concord, 

Meredith Vill'e 

New London, 

Newton, 

Pittsfield, 

Keene, 



Ira Pearson, 
Gibbon Williams, 
Ira Pearson, 
Gibbon Williams, 
Gibb. n Williams, 
Bela Wilcox, 
P. Richardson, 
Bela Wilcox, 



Preacher. 



Bela Wilcox, 
John Atwood, 
Bela Wilcox, 
E. B. Smith, 
Bela Wilcox, 
Thomas Rand, 
Samuel Everett, 
E. E. Cummings, 
B. Brierley, 
Ira Pearson, 
E. Worth, 
Reuben Sawyer, 
E. Worth, 
H. Archibald, 
O. O. Stearns, 
M Carpenter, 

A. T. Foss, 
Ira Pearson, 
H. Tonkin, 
Ira Pearson, 
H. Tonkin, 

B. Wheeler, 
H. Tonkin, 

E. E. Cummings, 
H. Tonkin, 

D, D. Pratt, 
G. Bobbins, 
S. Cooke, 
K. S. Hall, 
O. Ayer, 
K. S. Hall, 
Wm. Lamson, 
K. S.Hall, 

E. Worth, 
K. S. Hall, 
Wm. Lamson, 
K. S. Hall, 

E. E. Cummings, 
K. S. Hall, 
L. Tracy, 
K. S. Hall, 



Baron Stow, 
Ira Pearson, 
J. Bigbee, 



D. D. Pratt, 
Oren Tracy, 
D, D. Pratt; 

Reuben Sawyer, 
J. N, Brown, 



A. M. Swain, 
Nath'l Colver, 
E. E. Cummings, 
O. O. Stearns, 
Ira Pearson, 
O. Ayer, 
H. D. Dodge, 



Essayist. 



S. Cooke, 
B. Pease, 



E. B. Smith, 
E.E. Cum'gs, 
J. N- Brown, 



Isaac Sawyer, 
O. Barron, 
C. W. Flanders, 
G. Robbins, 
J. N. Chase, 



M. Carpenter 
A.M.Swain, 
J. M. Chick, 

T.G.Wright, 
G. Robbins, 



Wm. Lamson 
G. Robbins, 



W.H. Eaton, 



80 



COMPENDIUM OF PROCEEDINGS OF PASTORAL ASSOCIATION — Conclude I. 



Year 


Where Met. 1 


1858 


Exeter. 


1859 


Nashua. 


I860 


Newport, 


1 801 


Lake Village. 


1862 


Milford, 


1863 


Portsmouth, 


1864 


East Jaft'rey. 


1865 


Xe\\ London. 


1866 


Plaistow, 


1867 


Claremont, 


1868 


Manchester, 


1869 


Concord, 


1870 


Dover. 


1871 


Brentwood. 


1872 


Nashua, 


J 873 


Manchester, 


1874 


Great Falls. 


1875 


Claremont, 


1876 


Keene, 


1877 


Concord. 


1878 


Exeter, 



Pres. and Sec'y. Preacher 



\V. II. Eaton. 
K. S. Hall, 
J. M. Coburn. 
iK. S. Hall. 

D. Gage, 
K. S. Hall, 
I). Gage. 
K. S. Hall. 
(). Ayer, 
L. C. Stevens. 
L. Hayden, 
L. ( !. Stevens, 
J. D. Tilton, 
L. C. Stevens. 
O. Ayer. 
L. C. Stevens, 
J. S. Herrick. 
.John McKinlay, 

E. H. Smith, 
John McKinlay, 

F. Merriam, 
II. G. Safford, 

E. E. Cummings, 
H. G. Sattbrd. 
W. H. Eaton, 

jH. G. Sattbrd, 
A. Sherwin, 
H. G. Sattbrd. 
K. S. Hall. 

F. D. Blake. 
I). W. Faunce, 
H. O. Walker, 
E. E. Cummings, 
H. O. Walker/ 
H. G. Safford, 
C. W. Burnham, 
H. G. Hubbard, 
A. J. Hopkins, 
J. N. Chase, 
A. J. Hopkins, 
J. N. Chase, 

A. J. Hopkins, 



S. ( r. Abbott, 

L. Hayden, 
W. B. Clapp, 

J. M. Coburn, 
W. H. Eaton, 
George Pierce, 
L. U. Hill, 
J. I). Tilton. 
F. Daman. 
F. Merriam, 
L. C. Stevens. 

i D. W. Faunce. 
J. Storer, 
Win, Hurl in, 
H. H. Rhees, 
K. S. Hall, 
H. G. Hubbard. 

i K. S. Hall, 
J. N. Chase, 



Essayist. 



E. E. Cum- 
mings, 

F. Daman, 
T. II. Archi- 
bald, .... 

Geo. Pierce, 

O. Ayer, 

L. C. Stevens 

('. W. Flan- 
ders, 
L. Hayden. 

J. Storer. 

D.P.Deming 

W.N.Clarke. 



W. V. Garner. 
C. A. Towne, 



F. W. Towle 

E. Pepper. 

II.O. Walker 

E. Pepper, 

D. H. Stod- 
dard. 



FORM OF WILL OF LANDS AND GOODS 

TO THE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE BAPTIST CONVENTION. 



I give and devise to the New Hampshire Baptist Convention, a corpor- 
ation bylaw established in the State of New Hampshire, their successors 
and assigns, a certain [here describe the premises,] [or all my real estate, 

situate in , in the county of ,] to have and to hold the 

same to them the said New Hampshire Baptist Convention, their succes- 
sors and assigns forever. 

I give and bequeath to the New Hampshire Baptist Convention, a cor- 
poration by law established in the State of New Hampshire, the sum of 
dollars. 

I give and bequeath to the New Hampshire Baptist Convention, a cor- 
poration by law established in the State of New Hampshire, the sum of 
dollars, the same to be invested at the discretion of said Conven- 
tion, and the income thereof to be used for the purposes of said Conven- 
tion. 

HAVE YOU SEEN THEM ? 



TttE FHE3C0TT OUGAWS 

FINISHED IN 

New Upright Cases with tlie sliding Lid, New Solo stops, New Stop Action. 



J± FEW FACTS WORTH JCHTO-WT2XG-. 



OUR FACTORY has been in constant and successful operation since June, 
1836, and therefore is now the oldest establishment of the kind in the 
United States. 

THE ORGANS manufactured by us are, in all respects, first class, and 
the workmanship throughout is not surpassed by any in the market. 

OUR STYLES for the present season are all new and very attractive in de- 
sign. 

THE QUALITY OF TONE in these organs is not excelled by those of ANY 
make, while their volume avid brilliancy are remarkable. 

OUR PRICES will be found as low as work of this class can safely be afford- 
ed, and in fact lower than some of the inferior work so widely advertised. 

DEALERS IN ORGANS, as well as parties wishing to buy a reliable ORGAN 
FOR their private USE, are invited to call on, or to correspond with us, and 
learn just how well we can do by them. 

HELIOTYPES, PRICE LISTS AND CIRCULARS containing valuable informa- 
tion sent free on application, address 

THE PRESCOTT ORGAN CO., 

CONCORD, N. H. 




fidl 



NEW LONDON, N. H. 




E. J. MacEWAN, A. M., President, Now London. 
Miss A. L. SMILEY, Lady Principal, New London. 
Rev. S. C. FLETCHER, Secretary, New London. 

N. T. GREENWOOD, Esq., Treasurer, New London, 



Winter Term of 14 week begins Wednesday, Dec. 11, 1878. 

* VACATION OF TWO WEEKS. 

Spring Term of 13 weeks begins Wednesday, April 2, 1879. 
Anniversary Exercises, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, 
June 30, and July 1, and 2, 1879. 

— VACATION OF NINE WEEKS. 

Fall Term of 12 weeks begins Wednesday, Sept. 3, 1879. 



IsTOTIOE. 

Colby Academy is situated on New London Hill, and is 
reached by stage, leaving Bradford, twelve miles distant, at 5 
o'clock p. m ; and leaving Potter Place, eight miles distant, at 
12 o'clock i#. Passengers leaving Concord at 10:45 a.m., by 
the Northern Railroad, will find a stage in waiting at Potter 
Place, an 1 passengers leaving Concord at 3:30 p. m., by the 
Concord and Claremont Railroad, will find a stage in waiting 
at Bradford. 



HECKMAN IXl 
BINDERY INC. |§| 

MAR 97